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Facebook Aktie Börsengang zu 38,00 Dollar, ein Zuckerstück ? (Seite 1147)



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WhatsApp, and Instagram (via Instagram's Direct messaging feature), and they can share stories on any of these. But Zuckerberg wants to make private messaging as seamless as possible by allowing it to happen cross-platform.


"We plan to start by making it possible for you to send messages to your contacts using any of our services, and then to extend that interoperability to SMS too," Zuckerberg explained. "Of course, this would be opt-in and you will be able to keep your accounts separate if you'd like."

Facebook's ambition for a cross-platform private messaging service extends far beyond messaging. Zuckerberg said the company would build out this interoperability much as it expanded WhatsApp: start by fine-tuning messaging and secure communication, "and then build more ways for people to interact on top of that, including calls, video chats, groups, stories, businesses, payments, commerce, and ultimately a platform for many other kinds of private services."

Facebook has a lot to work with
While creating this enhanced network is undoubtedly a huge task, Facebook has a significant foundation to build on. As of the company's most recent updates on the monthly user numbers of its messaging platforms, WhatsApp and Messenger boasted 1.5 billion and 1.3 billion monthly active users, respectively.

Further highlighting how powerful Facebook's network effect would be if the company enabled cross-platform private communication, management said on its most recent earnings call that it boasted 2.7 billion people who used at least one of its applications in December, and over 2 billion people who were active daily.


If Facebook succeeds with Zuckerberg's vision to allow cross-platform private messaging, the company's lead over its competition would arguably be greater than it has ever been.

Newly released! 10 stocks we like better than Facebook
Investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Facebook wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

And when the Gardner brothers have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has quadrupled the market.*

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of March 1, 2019

Randi Zuckerberg, a former director of market development and spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Daniel Sparks has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


AUTHOR
Daniel Sparks
Daniel Sparks (TMFDanielSparks) Daniel Sparks is a senior technology specialist at The Motley Fool. He served in the U.S. Army on active duty and graduated with an MBA from Colorado State University. Follow him on Twitter for updates.
ARTICLE INFO
Mar 6, 2019 at 6:25PM
Technology and Telecom
STOCKS
Facebook Stock Quote
Facebook
NASDAQ:FB
$168.36 down $0.77 (-0.46%)
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How Does Facebook Make Money?
The company has turned status updates and pictures of your dog into a multibillion-dollar ad empire.
Motley Fool Staff
Mar 5, 2019 at 10:08AM
Practically everyone you know is on Facebook (NASDAQ: FB), but how does the tech company take all those profiles, likes, and comments and turn them into a business that brought in over $50 billion in revenue in 2018?

We're here to answer that question with a video from our YouTube channel! (A full transcript follows the video.)


10 stocks we like better than Facebook
When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has quadrupled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Facebook wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of March 1, 2019

Narrator: Facebook has a massive global audience. Every month, 2.3 billion people log in to its namesake platform to connect with friends and family.

That reach is practically unprecedented, and advertisers have taken notice – over 7 million use the platform to reach customers. Advertising is the moneymaker for Facebook, comprising 99% of the company's overall revenue.

In this video, we're going to explain how Facebook turned status updates and pictures of your dog into a multibillion dollar advertising empire.


The global digital advertising market is effectively a duopoly controlled by Facebook and Alphabet's (NASDAQ: GOOGL)(NASDAQ: GOOG) Google. In 2019, the two platforms are projected to control over 50% of the $327 billion market.

In 2018, Facebook logged over $55 billion in revenue, up 37% year-over-year.

Facebook and Google tackle advertising slightly differently, but their success comes down to the same thing -- Targeting!

Targeted advertising uses sophisticated methods to let marketers drill down to specific audiences -- the groups that have certain traits that are related to the product or message the advertiser is selling. The traits might be demographic and involve gender, age, the level of education, income level and/or employment. Or they could be psychographic traits that focus on the consumer's values, personality, attitudes, opinions, lifestyles and interests.


Add some behavioral variables to the equation like browser history, purchase history, and other recent online activity and you have a VERY firm idea of who a consumer is.

With all of these tools at their disposal, advertisers can focus on the most qualified people for their message, leading to better performing campaigns and higher return-on-investment for every ad dollar spent.

Facebook is a gold-mine for this kind of targeting, because it knows who you are, where you work, your friends, and interests from the page you follow. And it has that data on A LOT of people.
As already mentioned, Facebook has about 2.3 billion global Monthly Active Users, its photo-sharing property Instagram also boasts over 1 billion Monthly Active Users.

But some of that audience is more valuable to advertisers than others.


Of those 2.3 billion monthly Facebook users, about 10%, or 242 million, are in the United States and Canada. Instagram has approximately 132 million U.S. and Canadian users, or 13% of its total.

All told, North America made up 48% of the company's revenue in 2018.

That's because on a per-user basis, users in the U.S. and Canada are more valuable to advertisers. Ad rates are generally a reflection of consumer purchasing power.

Worldwide Facebook earned an average of roughly $25 per user on ads in 2018. But in the U.S. and Canada, that average was almost $110.

But big picture, growth in Facebook's home market is going to be harder to come by, because it's pretty saturated. Think about it, thanks to the network effect, most people you know are on Facebook. That's why you're on Facebook.

The platform had 231 million monthly active users at the end of 2016, in the past two years its only added 11 million to that total.
During that time, the platform saw international MAUs go from 1.6 billion to 2.1 billion.

So, what is Facebook doing to adjust?

The company has really turned on the ad-engine for its other properties like Instagram to help maintain its growth figures. Specific numbers are hard to come by, but one source estimated that Instagram's U.S. ad revenue jumped 70% in 2018. Other sources say Instagram's overall revenue will grow to $10.9 billion in 2019, a 22.5% jump, year over year.

The company also has two messaging apps -- WhatsApp and Messenger – that each have over a billion monthly users. But, so far, Mark Zuckerberg and company haven't quite figured out how to monetize them.

Targeted ads are the reason investors "Like" Facebook. Long-term the company will have to figure out how to port that model to its messaging properties OR find another way to monetize its untapped platforms.

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Randi Zuckerberg, a former Director of Market Development and Spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Dylan Lewis owns shares of Alphabet (A shares) and Facebook. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), and Facebook. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy." target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Facebook Wants to Build a Private-Messaging Behemoth
This move would likely give the social network an even greater competitive advantage.
Daniel Sparks (TMFDanielSparks)
Mar 6, 2019 at 6:25PM
Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) CEO Mark Zuckerberg has talked in depth on recent earnings calls about a growing shift in social networking to private messaging and stories. "People feel more comfortable being themselves when they know their content will only be seen by a smaller group and when their content won't stick around forever," Zuckerberg said on an earnings call last October.

In a note published on Wednesday, Zuckerberg detailed how Facebook plans to capitalize on this shift. The CEO laid out a vision that will require the company to evolve and build its services around privacy-focused communications.

Facebook Messenger 4, displayed on smartphones
FACEBOOK MESSENGER 4. IMAGE SOURCE: FACEBOOK.

The vision
Until now, Facebook has primarily focused on connecting the world through a public medium -- its core Facebook social network platform. But now the company wants to help people connect privately in "the digital equivalent of the living room."

Zuckerberg explained: "As I think about the future of the internet, I believe a privacy-focused communications platform will become even more important than today's open platforms. Privacy gives people the freedom to be themselves and connect more naturally, which is why we build social networks."

Facebook already has ways for users to communicate privately, and to share stories that are erased after twenty-four hours. Users can message each other through the company's platforms Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram (via Instagram's Direct messaging feature), and they can share stories on any of these. But Zuckerberg wants to make private messaging as seamless as possible by allowing it to happen cross-platform.


"We plan to start by making it possible for you to send messages to your contacts using any of our services, and then to extend that interoperability to SMS too," Zuckerberg explained. "Of course, this would be opt-in and you will be able to keep your accounts separate if you'd like."

Facebook's ambition for a cross-platform private messaging service extends far beyond messaging. Zuckerberg said the company would build out this interoperability much as it expanded WhatsApp: start by fine-tuning messaging and secure communication, "and then build more ways for people to interact on top of that, including calls, video chats, groups, stories, businesses, payments, commerce, and ultimately a platform for many other kinds of private services."

Facebook has a lot to work with
While creating this enhanced network is undoubtedly a huge task, Facebook has a significant foundation to build on. As of the company's most recent updates on the monthly user numbers of its messaging platforms, WhatsApp and Messenger boasted 1.5 billion and 1.3 billion monthly active users, respectively.

Further highlighting how powerful Facebook's network effect would be if the company enabled cross-platform private communication, management said on its most recent earnings call that it boasted 2.7 billion people who used at least one of its applications in December, and over 2 billion people who were active daily.


If Facebook succeeds with Zuckerberg's vision to allow cross-platform private messaging, the company's lead over its competition would arguably be greater than it has ever been.

Newly released! 10 stocks we like better than Facebook
Investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Facebook wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

And when the Gardner brothers have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has quadrupled the market.*

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of March 1, 2019

Randi Zuckerberg, a former director of market development and spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Daniel Sparks has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


AUTHOR
Daniel Sparks
Daniel Sparks (TMFDanielSparks) Daniel Sparks is a senior technology specialist at The Motley Fool. He served in the U.S. Army on active duty and graduated with an MBA from Colorado State University. Follow him on Twitter for updates.
ARTICLE INFO
Mar 6, 2019 at 6:25PM
Technology and Telecom
STOCKS
Facebook Stock Quote
Facebook
NASDAQ:FB
$168.36 down $0.77 (-0.46%)
RELATED ARTICLES
How Does Facebook Make Money?
Will Stories Ads Ever Catch Up to Feed Ads?
Why Businesses May Be the Biggest Drivers of Virtual Reality Growth
Is Facebook Undervalued Today?
Better Buy: Alibaba vs. Facebook



How Does Facebook Make Money?
The company has turned status updates and pictures of your dog into a multibillion-dollar ad empire.
Motley Fool Staff
Mar 5, 2019 at 10:08AM
Practically everyone you know is on Facebook (NASDAQ: FB), but how does the tech company take all those profiles, likes, and comments and turn them into a business that brought in over $50 billion in revenue in 2018?

We're here to answer that question with a video from our YouTube channel! (A full transcript follows the video.)


10 stocks we like better than Facebook
When investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has quadrupled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the ten best stocks for investors to buy right now… and Facebook wasn't one of them! That's right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

See the 10 stocks

*Stock Advisor returns as of March 1, 2019

Narrator: Facebook has a massive global audience. Every month, 2.3 billion people log in to its namesake platform to connect with friends and family.

That reach is practically unprecedented, and advertisers have taken notice – over 7 million use the platform to reach customers. Advertising is the moneymaker for Facebook, comprising 99% of the company's overall revenue.

In this video, we're going to explain how Facebook turned status updates and pictures of your dog into a multibillion dollar advertising empire.


The global digital advertising market is effectively a duopoly controlled by Facebook and Alphabet's (NASDAQ: GOOGL)(NASDAQ: GOOG) Google. In 2019, the two platforms are projected to control over 50% of the $327 billion market.

In 2018, Facebook logged over $55 billion in revenue, up 37% year-over-year.

Facebook and Google tackle advertising slightly differently, but their success comes down to the same thing -- Targeting!

Targeted advertising uses sophisticated methods to let marketers drill down to specific audiences -- the groups that have certain traits that are related to the product or message the advertiser is selling. The traits might be demographic and involve gender, age, the level of education, income level and/or employment. Or they could be psychographic traits that focus on the consumer's values, personality, attitudes, opinions, lifestyles and interests.


Add some behavioral variables to the equation like browser history, purchase history, and other recent online activity and you have a VERY firm idea of who a consumer is.

With all of these tools at their disposal, advertisers can focus on the most qualified people for their message, leading to better performing campaigns and higher return-on-investment for every ad dollar spent.

Facebook is a gold-mine for this kind of targeting, because it knows who you are, where you work, your friends, and interests from the page you follow. And it has that data on A LOT of people.
As already mentioned, Facebook has about 2.3 billion global Monthly Active Users, its photo-sharing property Instagram also boasts over 1 billion Monthly Active Users.

But some of that audience is more valuable to advertisers than others.


Of those 2.3 billion monthly Facebook users, about 10%, or 242 million, are in the United States and Canada. Instagram has approximately 132 million U.S. and Canadian users, or 13% of its total.

All told, North America made up 48% of the company's revenue in 2018.

That's because on a per-user basis, users in the U.S. and Canada are more valuable to advertisers. Ad rates are generally a reflection of consumer purchasing power.

Worldwide Facebook earned an average of roughly $25 per user on ads in 2018. But in the U.S. and Canada, that average was almost $110.

But big picture, growth in Facebook's home market is going to be harder to come by, because it's pretty saturated. Think about it, thanks to the network effect, most people you know are on Facebook. That's why you're on Facebook.

The platform had 231 million monthly active users at the end of 2016, in the past two years its only added 11 million to that total.
During that time, the platform saw international MAUs go from 1.6 billion to 2.1 billion.

So, what is Facebook doing to adjust?

The company has really turned on the ad-engine for its other properties like Instagram to help maintain its growth figures. Specific numbers are hard to come by, but one source estimated that Instagram's U.S. ad revenue jumped 70% in 2018. Other sources say Instagram's overall revenue will grow to $10.9 billion in 2019, a 22.5% jump, year over year.

The company also has two messaging apps -- WhatsApp and Messenger – that each have over a billion monthly users. But, so far, Mark Zuckerberg and company haven't quite figured out how to monetize them.

Targeted ads are the reason investors "Like" Facebook. Long-term the company will have to figure out how to port that model to its messaging properties OR find another way to monetize its untapped platforms.

Suzanne Frey, an executive at Alphabet, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Randi Zuckerberg, a former Director of Market Development and Spokeswoman for Facebook and sister to CEO Mark Zuckerberg, is a member of The Motley Fool's board of directors. Dylan Lewis owns shares of Alphabet (A shares) and Facebook. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Alphabet (A shares), Alphabet (C shares), and Facebook. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Facebook to Loosen Marijuana Restrictions – Now This Deserves a Like
https://www.thecannabisinvestor.ca/facebook-to-loosen-mariju…
1 Antwort?Die Baumansicht ist in diesem Thread nicht möglich.
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 60.060.674 von rtupp am 09.03.19 21:36:14 Alles Spekulationen die sich da öffnen und nichts ist entschieden.
Ich hoffe das Du das klar verstanden hast beim lesen des Artikels.:keks:

Gruss Springbok:)
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 60.062.146 von pickuru am 10.03.19 11:34:12
Ein verückter Beitrag ohne Hand und Fuss.
Selten so einen kranken Beitrag gelesen wie im Spiegel und der Zeit-Online.

Gruss Springbok:)
Mothly Fool Bericht mit Facebook.
https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/03/11/this-just-in-faceb…

Gruss Springbok:)
3 Antworten?Die Baumansicht ist in diesem Thread nicht möglich.
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 60.073.200 von springbok am 11.03.19 20:50:45 Ist doch klar das die Zeitungen wie die New York Times und viele andere Grossen versuchen Google und Facebook zu schädigen.
Weil ihnen die Reklameeinnahmen wegbrechen und wenige noch in Zeitungen die Reklame plazieren
Die Wut auf G+F ist darum so gross das sich gezwungen sehen mit schmutzigen Mitteln Beide zu schädigen.
So einfach ist die Antwort und darum gibt es im Forum die grossartigen Geister die das nicht verstehen und darum solche Berichte einstellen um ihre Wichtigkeit hervorzuheben.

Gruss Springbok:)
2 Antworten?Die Baumansicht ist in diesem Thread nicht möglich.
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 60.101.650 von springbok am 14.03.19 16:57:44
Datenausgleich ist in den USA erlaubt.

http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/netzpolitik/facebook-ermittle…

Gruss Springbok:)
1 Antwort?Die Baumansicht ist in diesem Thread nicht möglich.
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