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Codexis files for $100 million IPO: will public equity markets re-open for biofuels? - BD - Dec 29, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/29/codexis-files-for-ip…
:eek: :laugh:

DOE downgrades algae project for “only 78 percent” GHG reductions in grant review process - BD - Dec 29, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/29/doe-downgrades-algae…

"In Idaho, documents surfaced today relating to an unsuccessful bid by Idaho Sustainable Energy for a DOE Integrated Bioenergy Project, shedding interesting light on the DOE process, and raises questions about the technical expertise or document review time for the DOE’s unidentified reviewers.

Two notes: the DOE’s official response stated that the project’s proposed reduction in Greenhouse Gas emissions “was only 78 percent”:laugh: and was rated as a “Significant Weakness”.

In addition, a DOE examiner, according to ISE, asked about open-pond contamination control measures in the oral presentations, apparently not realizing that the ISE project is a closed-system bioreactor.:laugh: "
Algenzucht in Kläranlagen mit Abwärme von Kraftwerken
http://www.biomasse-nutzung.de/groste-klargas-algen-biokraftstoff-anlage-der-welt-in-neuseeland/
UK research team to probe bacterial methods for lignocellulose breakdown in bid to improve bioprocessing - BD - Dec 30, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/30/uk-research-team-to-…

"In the UK, researchers at Northumbria University, working with the UK’s Nonlinear Dynamics, have commenced a three-year project to analyze proteins found within the soil bacteria, Cellvibrio japonicus.

The researchers’ goal: to uncover information on the mechanisms by which bacteria break down lignocellulose and release sugars, and identify the proteins used by bacteria in the breakdown process. The researchers intend to develop means to reduce the cost of converting biomass to biofuels. "
Solazyme, Sapphire Energy, Sustainable Oils, Rentech, Terasol share “Biofuels Digest Company of the Year Award” for Achievement in Commercialization - BD - Dec 31 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/solazyme-sapphire-en…

"[BIOFUELS DIGEST NEWSWIRE] In Miami, Biofuels Digest announced that a group of companies associated with the advancement of aviation biofuels — Solazyme, Sapphire Energy, Sustainable Oils, Rentech, and Terasol — have jointly received the Biofuels Digest Company of the Year award for Achievement in Commercialization.


The awards were given in recognition of the companies significant contributions to the development of commercially-available renewable jet fuels, and have led to successful flight tests by commercial airlines, as well as orders from the US military and commercial operators for renewable jet fuel for testing and commercial use. Renewable aviation biofuels were named #8 on JWT Group’s “100 Things to Watch” list for 2010.

“Though cellulosic ethanol has made incredible strides towards commercialization this year,” said Biofuels Digest editor Jim Lane, “aviation biofuels have not only made huge progress, they represent the consensus choice of environmentalists, policymakers, and end users as a superior alternative to fossil-based aviation fuels. When the chairman of United Airlines steps up at a conference and says “we’re ready to be the customer,” you know that biofuels have the potential to capture a 60 billion gallon market (for commercial airlines alone) worth more than $100 billion in sales per year.”

“Among readers voting in the poll, and the editorial board, there was a clear sense that several companies and organizations had come together to advance this sector, and so the award is being shared by companies that have supplied fuels for testing and for use,” Lane added. “It is also important to recognize the immense efforts of the end-user community — including Boeing, the Civil Aviation Alternative Fuels Initiative (CAAFI), the Sustainable Aviation Fuel User’s Group (SAFUG), ATA, ICAO, IATA, Continental Airlines, Japan Air Lines, Air New Zealand, KLM, and Virgin Atlantic, among others, for their consistent and notable efforts in support of renewable aviation fuels.”

Biofuels Digest is the world’s most widely-read biofuels daily, with more than 50,000 unique readers via email, RSS and the web, as measured by Quantcast and Constant Contact. Solazyme, Sapphire Energy, Sustainable Oils, Rentech, Terasol will be recognized, along with other Biofuels Digest award winners, at the Advanced Biofuels Leadership Conference in Washington, DC on April 27-28, 2010. "
Honeywell’s UOP receives “Biofuels Digest Company of the Year Award” for Achievement in Processing Technology - BD - Dec 31, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/honeywells-uop-recei…
Biofuels Digest Personality of the Year: Dr. P V Subba Rao – President, R&D, Remfuel Bioenergy (India) - BD - Dec 31, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/biofuels-digest-pers…

"In Florida, Biofuels Digest announced that Dr. P V Subba Rao, President, R&D, Remfuel Bioenergy, has been named Biofuels Digest Personality of the Year in the third annual reader poll. This is the second year in a row that the award has gone to a non-US industry leader. Last years’ winner was Carlos St. James of the Argentine Renewable Energies Chamber.

Dr. Rao received 10 percent of the votes, while Dr. John Scott, chairman of PetroAlgae, received 5 percent and Gary Luce of Terrabon received 4 percent. The remaining 81 percent of votes were divided between more than 50 other candidates.

Remfuel is developing biofuel technologies, which eliminate transesterification for straight vegetable oil (SVO), animal fat oil and algal oil. REMB-1 is based on a new biodiesel source, which generates multi-fold income to the farmer compared to traditional biodiesel sources like Jatropha and requires no transesterification. According to the company, “this essentially eliminates the transesterification of fats, and allows any SVO, animal fat oil and algal oil to be used directly as a diesel blend.” "
50 Hottest Companies in Bioenergy for 2009-10: #13, Gevo - BD - Dec 31, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/50-hottest-companies…

("Gevo’s proprietary technology is a cost efficient ($0.30/gallon):eek: :eek: and rapid (6-9 months) retrofit of first generation ethanol capacity to make biobutanol. ...")
Bioenergy PROFITS Principles: Understand Global Economic Programs And Decisions - BD - Dec 31, 2009

- Dr. Rosalie Lober -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/bioenergy-profits-pr…

"Understand Global Economic Programs And Decisions

PROFITS Principle: Obtain Vital Information

Our last column focused on making sense of the various perspectives in biofuel production, particularly ethanol. This requires a knowledgeable awareness of global differences. We said that these differences are both geopolitical as well as political.

Today we continue the discussion by looking at the second action we specified for understanding global economic programs and decisions as we build our companies for sustainable growth.


Discover the underlying value driving diverse government programs

Almost all companies choose to invest time, effort and money in projects that create value. Value is perceived in the eye of the beholder. When governments bless projects, these projects tend to become successful. Having knowledge of global governments and becoming aware of how governments distinguish important attributes for their economics and politics will ultimately equip you with the ability to make the best judgments for deciding upon projects for investment.


China

Earlier we discussed that China is promoting ethanol-based fuel on a pilot basis in five cities in its central and northeastern regions, a move designed to create a new market for its surplus grain and reduce consumption of petroleum.

Government officials say the move is of great importance in helping to stabilize grain prices, raise farmers’ income and reducing petroleum induced air pollution. This is something to take serious consideration of in understanding the political climate if you want to enter Chinese markets. Companies are most successful when being respectful of and following existing business practices. These business practices are driven, in large measure, by local politics.


Thailand

Thailand already uses 10% ethanol (E10) widely on in the local markets. Thailand is now converting some of the cassava stock held by the government into fuel ethanol. Cassava-based ethanol productions are being expanded to help manage the agricultural outputs of both cassava and sugar cane.

With its abundant biomass resources, it is believed that the fuel ethanol program will be a new means of job creation in the rural areas while enhancing the balance sheet of fuel imports. Take note of this and when doing business in Thailand, you may want to build upon this knowledge when dealing with the government and funding sources.


Australia

We stated that legislation in Australia imposes a 10% cap on the concentration of fuel ethanol blends. Blends of 90% unleaded petroleum and 10% fuel ethanol are commonly referred to as E10.

Some concern in Australia was raised over the use of ethanol blend fuels in petroleum vehicles in 2008, yet manufacturers widely claimed that their vehicles could accept these ethanol blended fuels. Since then there have been no reports of adverse affects to vehicles running on ethanol blended fuels.


Caribbean

As a result of the guerilla movements in Central America, in 1983 the United States unilateral and temporarily approved the Caribbean Basin Initiative, allowing most countries in the region to benefit from several tariff and trade benefits. These benefits were made permanent in 1990 and more recently these benefits were replaced by the Caribbean Basin Trade and Partnership Act, approved in 2000, and the Dominican Republic–Central America Free Trade Agreement that went to effect in 2008.

All these agreements have allowed several countries in the region to export ethanol to the U.S free of tariffs. Until 2004, the countries that benefited the most were Jamaica and Costa Rica, but as the United States. began demanding more fuel ethanol, the two countries increased their exports and two others began exporting. In 2007, Jamaica, El Salvador, Trinidad & Tobago and Costa Rica exported a total of 230.5 million gallons of ethanol to the United States, representing 54.1% of U.S. fuel ethanol imports. Brazil began exporting ethanol to the United States in 2004 and exported 188.8 million gallons representing 44.3% of U.S. ethanol imports in 2007. The remaining imports that year came from Canada and China.

In March 2007, “ethanol diplomacy” was the focus of President George W. Bush’s Latin American tour, in which he and Brazil’s president, Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, were seeking to promote the production and use of sugar cane based ethanol throughout Latin America and the Caribbean. The two countries also agreed to share technology and set international standards for biofuels. The Brazilian sugar cane technology transfer would allow several Central American, Caribbean and Andean countries to take advantage of their tariff-free trade agreements to increase or become exporters to the United States in the short-term.

Also, in August 2007, Brazil’s President toured Mexico and several countries in Central America and the Caribbean to promote Brazilian ethanol technology. The ethanol alliance between the U.S. and Brazil generated some negative reactions from Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez, and by then Cuba’s President, Fidel Castro, who wrote that “you will see how many people among the hungry masses of our planet will no longer consume corn.” “Or even worse,” he continued, “by offering financing to poor countries to produce ethanol from corn or any other kind of food, no tree will be left to defend humanity from climate change.” Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua’s President, and one of the preferential recipients of Brazilian technical aid also voiced critics to the Bush plan, but he vowed support for sugar cane based ethanol during Lula’s visit to Nicaragua.

Understanding this evolution of biofuels policy, the challenges it posed and the controversy it triggered is critical knowledge for companies that expect to conduct business and anticipate success in this region.


Columbia

Colombia’s ethanol program began in 2002. It is based on a law approved in 2001 mandating a mix of 10% ethanol with regular gasoline. The plan is to gradually reach a 25% blend in twenty-years. Sugar cane-based ethanol production began in 2005.

On March 2009 the Colombian government enacted a mandate to introduce E85 flexible-fuel cars. The government mandate applies to all gasoline-powered vehicles with engines smaller than 2.0 liters manufactured, imported, and commercialized in the country beginning in 2012, mandating that 60% of such vehicles must have flex-fuel engines capable of running with gasoline or E85, or any blend of both.

By 2014 the mandatory quota is 80% and it will reach 100% by 2016. All vehicles with engines bigger than 2.0 liters must be E85 capable starting in 2013. The decree also mandates that by 2011 all gasoline stations must provide infrastructure to guarantee availability of E85 throughout the country. The mandatory introduction of E85 flex-fuels has been controversial.

Once again, this information is crucial for any company that expects to operate a successful business in Columbia and other parts of the Central American region.


Costa Rica

Earlier we talked about the National Biofuel Program in Costa Rica, which established the mandatory use of all gasoline sold in Costa Rica with a blend of around 7.5% ethanol, starting in October 2008.

The Costa Rican government expects to increase the percent of ethanol mixed with gasoline to 12% within the next 5 years. The Costa Rican government is pursuing this policy to lower the country’s dependency of foreign oil and to reduce the amount of greenhouse gases produced. The plan also calls for an increase in ethanol producing crops and tax breaks for flex-fuel vehicles and other alternative fuel vehicles.

The introduction of the blend of 7% ethanol was postponed in September 2008 until the beginning of 2009. This delay was due to a request by the national association of fuel retailers to have more time available to adapt their fueling infrastructure. Additional delays caused another postponement, as fueling stations were not ready yet for handling ethanol fuel, and now implementation is expected for November 2009.

Despite the official postponement, during the months of February and March 2009, ethanol in different blends was sold without warning to consumers, which was cause for complaints. The national distribution company, RECOPE, explained that it had already bought 50,000 barrels of ethanol stored and ready for distribution. It decided to use this ethanol as an oxygenate in substitution of MTBE. Nevertheless, retail sales of E7 continue uninterrupted in the trial regions of Guanacaste and the Central Pacific for three years now.

This information again is essential for running a biofuels business of any kind in this region.


El Salvador

In the last section we highlighted the cooperation agreement between the United States and Brazil, El Salvador was chosen in 2007 to lead a pilot experience to introduce state-of-the-art technology for growing sugar cane for production of ethanol fuel in Central America. As more cooperative alliances are formed globally, there will be greater opportunities for a tipping point for biofuels to be the recognized fuel of choice globally.

Obtain Vital Information is one of the Bioenergy PROFITS Principles, highlighted in Dr. Rosalie Lober’s, newly released book, Run Your Business like a Fortune 100: 7 Principles for Boosting PROFITS. Learn here, how you can apply some of the best practices and proven principles of successful biofuels companies for running your business most effectively in this current world of climate change and renewable energy. "
“The really bloody shame is that of those 3,000, there are maybe 100 to 150 strains that remain” - BD - Dec 31, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/the-really-bloody-sh…

"From Wired: “For nearly 20 years, a government laboratory built a living, respiring library of carefully collected organisms in search of something that could grow quickly while producing something precious: oil. But now that collection has largely been lost. National Renewable Energy Laboratory scientists found and isolated around 3,000 species algae from construction ditches, seasonal desert ponds and briny mashes across the country in a major bioprospecting effort to find the best organisms to convert sunlight and carbon dioxide into fuel for cars…“The really bloody shame is that of those 3,000, there are maybe 100 to 150 strains that remain at the University of Hawaii,” said Al Darzins, who heads up the resurgent algal biofuels research program at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.” ..."
Molecular breeding gains popularity as answer to, complement of, genetic modification - BD/SA/NYT - Dec 31, 2009
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2009/12/31/molecular-breeding-g…
www.nytimes.com/gwire/2009/12/21/21greenwire-quiet-biotech-r…

"Articles in Scientific American and The New York Times highlighted the growing interest in molecular breeding, a set of microbiology techniques. In molecular breeding, DNA markers are identified to target child plants that have inherited a defined group of genes from a parent — genes associated with a desirable trait (for example, disease resistance).

By targeting DNA markers, molecular breeders cut down the breeding time cycles and, according to Scientific American, improve “the crop’s genetic gain, the generational improvements made to a crop.” These crops are not designated as genetically modified, although GM is used in tandem — for example, to trial the silencing or expression of a group of genes, which can be thereafter targeted using non-GMO, molecular breeding techniques. "
India's 20 percent Biofuels Mandate is back - BD - Jan 4, 2010

- Joelle Brink -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/04/india’s-20-percent-b…

"Like Old Saint Nick, the new incarnation of India’s 20% biofuels mandate arrived in Delhi on Christmas Eve, bringing tidings of great joy to those inside and many outside the industry, including the announcement of a national biofuel fund for second generation biofuels.

This time Prime Minister Manmohan Singh signed a mandate that had already been endorsed by the Confederation of Indian Industry Biofuels Committee and presented at the negotiation sessions in Copenhagen. It was welcomed by a booming auto industry that has seen an unprecedented increase in new car sales due to the strong economy and the introduction of Tata’s Nano and its low-priced competitors—all capable of running E20 in petrol.

At the same time the Indian industry has become more internationally oriented. This year’s CII Biofuels Summit in Delhi was jointly sponsored by the India Brazil Chamber of Commerce and featured both Indian and Brazilian experts as speakers. An Indo-U.S. MoU has also been signed on second generation bio-fuels like cellulosic ethanol and algal biodiesel. And at the Copenhagen summit Praj Industries Executive Chairman Pramod Chaudhari signed an MOU with Danish enzyme specialist Novozymes on development of advanced biofuels. The two companies have worked together on conventional biofuels for some time.

Biomass supply problems still remain an issue, but the industry has now reached the “2.0” stage of production technology, having incorporated the lessons of past failures along with current plant science and innovative farming practices. One example is the Jatropha 2.0 system, which attracts experienced farmers with income from Jatropha planting and pruning on nearby wasteland during their fallow season, and enables them to attend to their own crops full time during the growing and harvesting seasons.

Climate change and freakish weather will likely continue to be a problem, as will the continued fall of the country’s water table due to large scale irrigated farming. However initiatives aimed at switching to dryland crops that do not require continual irrigation are beginning to pay off and Praj Industries recently showed a sustainable zero-waste production system for drought-tolerant sweet sorghum that produces only ethanol and compost for the next crop.

A similar sugar cane system that the company implemented in Colombia has been hailed as a game changer for the international ethanol industry.


Administrative coordination of the new mandate may turn out to be the biggest challenge of all.
Taking a lesson from the problems encountered in its previous attempt, this time the government has specified the roles of the Prime Minister and each ministry, cabinet officer and committee, along with the policies and measures to be instituted, such as:

+ The setting up of a National Biofuel Coordination Committee under prime minister for broader policy perspective

+ The setting up of a Biofuel Steering Committee under the cabinet secretary to oversee implementation of policy

+ The ministry of new and renewable energy to be the co-ordinating ministry for biofuel development and utilisation, with scientific agencies being assigned specific roles

+ Bio-diesel production to be encouraged from non-edible oil seeds in waste, degraded, marginal land

+ An indicative target of 20 percent blending of bio-fuels in diesel and ethanol by 2017

+ Minimum support price to be announced for farmers producing non-edible oil seeds, and

+ Financial incentives for second generation biofuels, including a national biofuel fund "
Today in Biofuels Opinion: “the proposal would essentially require every ethanol plant in the country to obtain a Title V permit.” - BD - Jan 4, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/04/today-in-biofuels-op…

"From Growth Energy: “The Greenhouse Gas Tailoring Rule, as proposed by EPA, would establish new thresholds for GHGs that define when new or existing industrial facilities – including ethanol plants – would be required to obtain or modify construction and operational air permits. As written, the proposal would essentially require every ethanol plant in the country to obtain a Title V permit. But, as Growth Energy pointed out in its comments, operating under that permit on an annual basis would be an extraordinary cost for independently-operated ethanol plants.”

Patrick Kelly, American Petroleum Institute: “Once you go over 10 percent, the fuel economy loss is more noticeable. If you fill up at E85, you’re only going to go two-thirds on the same tank of gasoline. Your price per gallon is going to be the same but your price per mile is going to go up. These are all things that are being studied by the auto industry and the Department of Energy. If E10 is OK and E85 is not, what is the number in between that’s compatible with the current fleet of engines?” "
Cuba has 2-3.2 Bgy ethanol potential, reviving sugarcane industry: report - BD - Jan 4, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/04/cuba-has-2-3-2-bgy-e…

"In Cuba, COHA has prepared an extensive survey of the proposed resurgence of sugarcane cultivation, and ethanol production, in Cuba, under the patronage of Raul Castro.

According to the report, Cuba has the potential to produce 2-3.2 Bgy of sugarcane ethanol. Potential stumbling blocks: sugarcane productivity has dropped in Cuba to as low as 22 tons per acre, around half the productivity in the Dominican Republic. From the report: “It is estimated that if Cuban mills cogenerated electricity from bagasse, the island could add up to four gigawatts of power to its grid, roughly equivalent to adding four nuclear power plants to the island.

Moreover, an action as simple as modernizing the existing mills would augment their electrical generation capacity from 600 MW to at least 1400-1600 MW. This would represent ?more than a 50 percent increase of the National Electric Energetic System’s (NEES) total power capacity of 2940 MW in 2005.” "
GM tobacco has up to 60 percent higher oil content than soybeans, per acre: report - BD - Jan 4, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/04/gm-tobacco-has-up-to…

"In Pennsylvania, researchers with the Biotechnology Foundation Laboratories at Thomas Jefferson University have increased oil yields from tobacco leaves to 6.8 percent. Tobacco seeds have up to 40 percent oil content, but seed yields are in the 0.6 tons per acre range. With tobacco leaf productivity in the 1.5 tons per acre range, the total oil yield could increase to as high as .342 tons, or 90 gallons, per acre — significantly higher than oil yields from soybeans.

According to the researchers report, “By genetic engineering, they achieved oil yields of 5.8% oil per dry weight by modifying the DGAT while changes to the LEC2 resulted in a yield of 6.8% per dry weight.” "
da Ihr ja mal gefragt hattet, wie diese Farmen aussehen -aus dem entsprechendem PALG Thread:
Sundrop Fuels emerges from stealth with 1 Bgy solar biofuels project competitive with $85-$100 oil - BD - Jan 11, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/11/sundrop-fuels-emerge…

"In Colorado, one of the most interesting biofuels propositions in quite some time, Sundrop Fuels, is emerging from stealth mode.

Science magazine readers would have seen a short note in a December 11th story on solar-powered biofuels (which covered efforts by researchers to “reverse the combustion of fossil fuels, using sunlight to reenergize molecules from thin air (or water) to make fuels that can then be used anytime, anywhere.”

The note deadpanned: “Sundrop Fuels Inc., an energy start-up based in Louisville, Colorado, recently commissioned a 1-megawatt solar array to convert wood waste and other forms of biomass into a gaseous blend of carbon monoxide and hydrogen—known as synthesis gas—that can be converted into gasoline.”

So here’s the scoop: Sundrop Fuels is a solar gasification-based renewable energy company with headquarters in Louisville, Colorado. The company’s advanced high-temperature solar gasification process turns almost any kind of plant material into electricity or liquid transportation fuel. The Sundrop Fuels process centers on its SurroundSun reactor technology, a proprietary solar-thermal biomass gasifier mounted on a tower and powered by a concentrating mirror field below, creating temperatures of nearly 1,300°C.




The process allows Sundrop to add solar energy to the process, rather than diverting energy from biomass to drive gasification. In a Sundrop fuel gallon, 30 percent of the energy is solar, the remainder is energy from biomass. No traditional burning of up to 1/3 of the biomass to provide power for the system. Sundrop is achieving up to 100 gallons per ton using woody biomass and sorghum in its pilot operations, and said that another 25 percent increase in yields were possible. This efficiency allows Sundrop Fuels to compete directly with petroleum products by producing ultra-clean fuels for an unsubsidized cost of between $2 and $3 per gallon.

Another potential advantage is scale. The company’s fundamental unit is 50-100 Mgy, but it said that because its operating costs were lower than more traditional technologies, and because it is realizing higher yields and utilizing biomass more efficiently – it can economically take biomass from a wider radius and capture economies of scale with larger production capacities. Management said that their modeling suggests they can feasibly scale up to 1 billion gallons per energy park, and compete with $85-$100 oil. An innovation to make that possible, the use of 100-ton railroad cars of biomass instead of using trucks. The company said it has a compression technology for biomass to make rail cost effective.

The company is developing a 5-6 Mgy commercial demo which will be open in mid-2012, and ultimately the company will look to develop projects internationally, targeting sun-drenched regions such as North Africa, the Middle East, and parts of China.

Sundrop Fuels’ chief exec is Wayne Simmons, previously the founding CEO of Velocys. Key elements of Sundrop Fuels’ core technology were developed by and are licensed through the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Renewable Energy Lab. Sundrop Fuels’ predecessor company, Solarec, actually began developing concentrated solar technology a decade ago with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. CTO is Dr. Alan Weimer of the University of Colorado. He directs a consortium between Colorado’s universities and NREL that continues working on this approach (NREL developed the concentrating solar mirrors), and has been responsible for developing and spinning off the solar-driven gasification technology. Sundrop Fuels is backed by two of the world’s premier venture groups, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Buyers and Oak Investment Partners.

The company has a pilot scale facility in place in Broomfield, about 15 miles from Louisville, the last stage before a full-scale solar tower. The company is now actively pursuing funding and strategic partnerships toward completion of its first commercial-scale facility. "
Qatar Airways, Airbus, and Qatar Petroleum announce aviation biofuels development project - BD - Jan 11, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/11/qatar-airways-airbus…

"In Qatar, Qatar Airways, Qatar Science & Technology Park, Qatar Petroleum and Airbus announced the establishment of the Qatar Advanced Biofuel Platform, which will prepare a detailed engineering and implementation plan for economically viable and sustainable biofuel production, a biofuel investment strategy, and an advanced technology development program.

Last October, Qatar Airways successfully conducted the world’s first commercial flight powered by a Gas-to-Liquid fuel blend last October, which proved to be a significant development in the use of alternative fuels.


The group has been advised by Seattle-based US-based Verno Systems Inc., embarked on a very comprehensive and detailed feasibility study on sustainable Biomass-to-Liquid (BTL) jet fuel. QABP will be structured so that it can be expanded to include additional projects, technologies, investments and partnerships globally, and is focused on short, medium and long term goals. The partners have not disclosed feedstocks or timing at this point, although Airbus noted that the QABP is an “Important step to reach carbon neutral growth in the aviation sector by 2020.”

Speaking with the Digest, Verno partners Anthony Bay and Evan Smith looked at some of the longer term implications of continuing moves by aviation partners into the biofuels space. “Its an opportunity for the end-users to change from being price-takers.”

Verno noted that, in order for aviation biofuels to advance in the 2010s, the development of feedstocks, capital, technology and policy are critical factors, but even more key is “an agreed set of sustainability standards.” They added that governments, NGOs, and communities must become comfortable with the sustainability credentials, noting that land-use and genetic modification are just two of the issues that must be broadly agreed in terms of international standards, and validated by the environmental community, in order to assure the viability of aviation biofuels.

The partners pointed, for example, to the difficulties of projects that “don’t hit the criteria,” noting that Tanzania placed a moratorium recently on jatropha production after negative reports in the press regarding the sustainability of commercial jatropha development in the country.

On feedstocks, Verno confirmed that jatropha, camelina, algae and salicornia – cited by Boeing as key feedstocks in the next few years — will be a part of the overall global biofuels R&D equation, but declined to discuss the specific feedstocks studied in the Qatar project, and noted that other feedstocks such as waste biomass and residues may also play a role in the development of aviation biofuels in the next decade.


Verno noted that the strong participation of end-users aimed at to securing long term renewable energy supply at stable prices has been more common, to date, in the power business, citing the role of utilities in developing wind projects, but predicted that progressive airlines and consortiums could be expected to continue to play a strong role in the development of fuels for the sector. "
UK researchers develop air-lift loop bioreactor, can save up to 18 percent on energy consumption for microbubble generation - BD - Jan 11, 2010

- by Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/11/uk-researchers-devel…

"In the UK, researchers from the University of Sheffield have developed an air-lift loop bioreactor, which creates microbubbles using 18% less energy consumption. Microbubbles are miniature gas bubbles of less than 50 microns diameter in water. They are able to transfer materials in a bioreactor much more rapidly than larger bubbles produced by conventional bubble generation techniques and they consume much less energy.

The team’s unique adaption of the bioreactor and creation of microbubbles has the potential to revolutionise the energy-efficient production of biofuels.The approach is currently being tested with researchers from Suprafilt in Rochdale on industrial stack gases. The team are also currently testing the application of the device with local water company Yorkshire Water. They are using the components of the bioreactor that produce microbubbles to give a better performance in the treatment of wastewater. They are predicting to reduce the current electricity costs for this process by a third.
:eek: Professor Martin Tillotson, from Yorkshire Water, said: “Many of our processes use forced air in order to treat water and wastewater streams and, given the huge volumes, it is very costly in electricity and carbon terms.” "
OriginOil Discovers Algae Daily Harvest Constant; Researchers discover an important metric for designing efficient industrial algae production systems - Jan 12, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/originoil-discovers-algae’s-d…

"Los Angeles, CA January 12, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, announced that ongoing industrial algae experiments have uncovered a constant daily rate of algae production. This Daily Harvest Constant is reached once the algae stabilizes into steady state growth. Algae can be harvested on a daily basis, enabling industrial levels of production. In a series of experiments in 2009, OriginOil researchers have learned that the amount that can be harvested in the organism’s steady state appears to stabilize at a specific amount of algae biomass per day, regardless of the concentration of algae.

OriginOil operations VP Scott Fraser commented: “This Daily Harvest Constant is a potential industry breakthrough, because it makes it clear that increasing the concentration of algae beyond a certain level will not be productive for daily harvests. The understanding of this Daily Harvest Constant growth curve will allow the design of ultra-efficient systems that are optimized around the lowest possible concentration that can still deliver continuous daily production of algae.

The Daily Harvest Constant will be tested in different configurations and scales by OriginOil researchers. The company’s research partners, the Idaho National Laboratory of the Department of Energy and IIRMES (the research laboratory of Cal State Long Beach), are expected to assist materially in this task. To the company’s knowledge, no other industrial algae production system has incorporated the Daily Harvest Constant concept in its design.


About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
wer Literatur zum Thema "Jatropha" sucht, sollte sich vielleicht mal in Deren Bibliothek anmelden;) :

The “new jatropha”: SG Biofuels partners with Life Technologies to accelerate new cultivar development by 60 percent; product line this year, says CEO - BD - Jan 12, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/12/the-new-jatropha-sg-biofuels-partners-with-life-technologies-to-accelerate-new-cultivar-development-by-60-percent-product-line-this-year-says-ceo/

"In California, jatropha pioneer SG Biofuels announced a strategic alliance with Life Technologies Corporation, a provider of innovative life science solutions, to advance the development of Jatropha as a sustainable biofuel.

The alliance brings together SG Biofuels’ Genetic Resource Center, featuring the largest and most diverse library of Jatropha genetic material in the world:eek: , with the advanced biotechnology and synthetic biology tools of Life Technologies.

The partnership will initially include sequencing the Jatropha curcas genome, allowing for the rapid introduction of new traits targeted toward increasing the yield of the oil-producing plant. Life Technologies will also become a strategic partner in SG Biofuels.


Life Technologies is a global biotechnology tools company with more than $3 billion in sales, formed by the 2008 merger of Invitrogen Corporation and Applied Biosystems. The strategic alliance is the first announced by Life in the biofuels arena, and Life CEO Greg Lucier is expected to announce the alliance as the first step in a broader engagement with biofuels at the JP Morgan investment conference today.

By combining our library of Jatropha DNA with the extensive genetic expertise and resources of Life Technologies, we have the opportunity to unlock the true potential ofjJatropha as the most profitable and sustainable biofuel feedstock,” said Kirk Haney, President and Chief Executive Officer of SG Biofuels. “Sequencing the genome will allow us to rapidly develop region-specific cultivars from the promising traits we’ve already identified.”

For SG and jatropha, the alliance represents, one one level, validation — based on the technical deep-dive that presages such an announcement on SG and its development path. It also says something about the development prospects for jatropha.

In terms of metrics, the Life alliance is expected to reduce the cycle time for bringing new jatropha cultivars to market by 60 percent, from five years to two years. “Most companies in the space said that our molecular genetics were the best in the world,” said Haney. “What was missing was the gene sequencing horsepower that would accelerate our drive to produce the most profitable jatropha cultivars for our customers.”

SG is on track to release its first product this year, and to commence rapid commercialization of its library of jatropha DNA. The company is ultimately expected to release a set of genetically-modified jatropha cultivars and a set of non-GMO cultivars. Prospective customers: jatropha developers, strategic investors from the oil and chemical industries looking for long-term substitutes for fossil petroleum, and landholders in jatropha’s potential geographies in Latin America, Asia and Africa, where jatropha has grown wild for many years but has struggled to make the transition from locally produced genome to industrial bioprocessing platform.

“Jatropha the plant did not fail,” Haney contends, “jatropha the business model failed.” D1 Oils Plant Science execs confirmed last year that, in their view, 90 percent of global jatropha plantings should simply be pulled up, as they were improperly selected and poorly tended, and the plants in the ground were unlikely to thrive.

For newer readers of the Digest, SG represents a new fork in jatropha development. In the 2000s, a number of developers emerged in jatropha, hailing it as a high-yield, stress-tolerant, non-food “wonder crop” that could be grown on fallow and otherwise unproductive land. As the Digest’s March 2009 story “The Blunder Crop: a Biofuels Digest special report on jatropha biofuels development,” detailed, “things would be going great if they weren’t going so badly.”

But even that report, which detailed a series of missteps in jatropha developement, suggested that “Kirk Haney tells me there’s nothing to worry about with his jatropha biofuels company, SG Biofuels, and I believe him. A successful practioner of sustainable forestry in Central America via the teak trade, Haney has assembled a top-tier team for SG and is doing the soil testing and the extensive planning — the “hard, dirty work of progress”, to borrow Rob Elam’s memorable phrase — that will turn jatropha dreams into actual viable industry.”

In recent months, jatropha has begun to turn a corner. Though pioneers such as D1 Oils have fallen further into difficulties — with major investor Principle Capital now calling for the company to exit jatropha developemnt altogether — there is good news these past week and months. GEM Biofuels has commenced shipping crude jatropha oil from Madagascar, Mission Bioenergy in Australia has steadied its balance sheet, the aviation industry has embraced jatropha as a near-term candidate for aviation biofuels feedstock and conducted successful flight tests, and now SG’s alliance with Life promises to accelerate the next generation of high-profit cultivars. Of particular interest: SG’s announcement from last year that it had identified cold-tolerant jatropha varietals in its collection efforts in Central America. Work on those traits — using SG’s existing breeding techniques, now combined with Life’s genome sequencing tools — may well expand the geography for jatropha over the next 5-10 years.

Though airlines would like jatropha oil — a lot of it — at parity pricing with crude oil, and now, thank you — the turnaround for jatropha should continue to be measured in years, rather than weeks or months — SG’s news that it will release products this year is exciting, but it takes several years to realize a major harvest from newly planted jatropha. But if the horizons must be long-term at this stage — the SG concept of applying the disciplines of molecular genetics to the platform of jatropha is beginning to bear fruit.

Thoughtful investors might well begin to revise jatropha yield and geography expectations towards the late-middle 2010s, just when proposed national carbon emission targets are really starting to bite. "
DOE awards $78 million for National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts, and National Advanced Biofuels Consortium - BD, WASHINGTON - Jan 13, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/13/doe-awards-78-millio…
www.energy.gov/news2009/documents2009/ARRA_Projects_0112110.…

"In Washington, US Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today announced the investment of nearly $80 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for advanced biofuels research and fueling infrastructure that will help support the development of a clean sustainable transportation sector. The selections announced today – two biofuels consortia for up to $78 million to research algae-based– are part of the Department’s continued effort to spur the creation of the domestic bio-industry while creating jobs.

“Advanced biofuels are crucial to building a clean energy economy,” said Secretary Chu. “By harnessing the power of science and technology, we can bring new biofuels to the market and develop a cleaner and more sustainable transportation sector. This investment will help spur the creation of the domestic bio-industry, while creating jobs and reducing our dependence on foreign oil.”


Biofuels Consortia

Two cross-functional groups will seek to break down critical barriers to the commercialization of algae-based and other advanced biofuels such as green aviation fuels, diesel, and gasoline that can be transported and sold using today’s existing fueling infrastructure. The selected projects consist of leading scientists and engineers from universities, private industry, and government, and will facilitate sharing expertise and technologies.

The two consortia selected for funding are:

National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts (NAABB)
($44 million)—Led by the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (St. Louis, MO), NAABB will develop a systems approach for sustainable commercialization of algal biofuel (such as renewable gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and bioproducts. NAABB will integrate resources fromcompanies, universities, and national laboratories to overcome the critical barriers of cost, resource use and efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial viability. It will develop and demonstrate the science and technology necessary to significantly increase production of algal biomass and lipids, efficiently harvest and extract algae and algal products, and establish valuable certified co-products that scale with renewable fuel production. Co-products include animal feed, industrial feedstocks, and additional energy generation. Multiple test sites will cover diverse environmental regions to facilitate broad deployment.

Partners are: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific, Northwest National Laboratory, University of Arizona, Brooklyn College, Colorado State University, New Mexico State University, Texas AgriLife Research ?Texas A&M University System, University of California Los Angeles, University of California San Diego, University of Washington, Washington University in St. Louis, Washington State University, AXI, Catilin, Diversified Energy, Eldorado Biofuels, Genifuel, HR BioPetroleum, Inventure, Kai BioEnergy, Palmer Labs, Solix Biofuels, Targeted Growth, Terrabon, UOP.


National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) (up to $33.8 million)—Led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, NABC will conduct cutting-edge research to develop infrastructure compatible, biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels. The result will be a sustainable, cost-effective production process that maximizes the use of existing refining and distribution infrastructure. NABC will investigate a variety of process strategies and down select to those closest to larger scale demonstration. The NABC plans to further develop these strategies to deliver a pilot-ready process, with full lifecycle analysis to measure the environmental benefits.

Partners are: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Albemarle Corporation, Amyris Biotechnologies, Argonne National Laboratory, BP Products North America Inc., Catchlight Energy, LLC, Colorado School of Mines, Iowa State University, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pall Corporation, RTI International, Tesoro Companies Inc., University of California, Davis, UOP, LLC, Virent Energy Systems, Washington State University.

Collectively, these consortia will be matched by private and non-federal cost-share funds of more than $19 million for total project investments of over $97 million.

Secretary Chu also announced today the selection of eight infrastructure projects to receive up to $1.6 million to support expanded fueling infrastructure for ethanol blends. The projects announced today will expand ethanol blends infrastructure at existing retail fueling locations in nine states: Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Missouri, Texas, Virginia, and Washington. The projects plan to install E85 pumps, retrofit existing pumps to dispense E85, and install blender pumps that offer ethanol blends up to 85 percent at over 60 stations. Collectively, the projects propose creating at least 45 E85 dispensers and 16 blender pumps along key driving corridors and areas with higher concentrations of flexible fuel vehicles.

The infrastructure projects will be matched with $3.9 million in non-federal cost-share funds, for total projects investments of $5.5 million. "
ist auch so ein "WO Liebling", k.A. wie ernstzunehmend das zu sehen ist, an diesem "Schockwellen" Ansatz wird aber auch gerade bei OOIL gefeilt &ist wohl einer der Knackpunkte:

Cobalt aims for rapi commercialization of butanol; continuous algae oil extraction system; reaction to Baker Institute report - BD - Jan 13, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/13/cavitation-technolog…

"In California, Cavitation Technologies announced that it has filed a patent application for a “Method for Processing an Algae to Produce Algal Oil and By-Products”. According to CTI, the technology is able to extract oil from algae on a continuous basis utilizing cavitation based extraction, adding that “CTI’s Nano reactor is used to create cavitation bubbles in a solvent material, when these bubbles collapse near the cell walls it creates shock waves and liquid jets that cause those cells walls to break and release their contents into the solvent.” The company plans to license the technology to algal fuel developers.

Among other uses of sound waves in biofuels, Los Alamos National Laboratory announced a partnership with Solix Biofuels to use LANL sound-wave technology to optimize algal growth. According to a report last September in Earth2Tech at the time of the initial R&D agreement between LANL and Solix, “Los Alamos’ acoustic-focusing technology generates ultrasonic fields that concentrate algal cells into a dense sludge and extract oil. Solix hopes that combining the concentration and extraction steps into one process will eliminate the need for centrifuges and solvents (traditional extraction methods) — and at the same time, significantly cut the cost of producing the biofuel.”

Acoustic focusing is also used in the LANL’s Acoustic Focusing Cytometer, which allows scientists to quantitate and examine cells by passing them through a laser-based detection device. Thousands of cells per second may be analyzed individually, allowing rapid characterization of entire populations of cells and the detection of rare cells. The Cytometer was licensed and commercialized by Life Technologies, which yesterday announced a straregic alliance with jatropha pioneer SG Biuofuels to bring Life’s microbiology tools to the bioenergy business.

http://nuclearstreet.com/blogs/nuclear_power_news/archive/2010/01/12/los-alamos-national-laboratory-top-10-science-stories-of-2009-01125.aspx "
Algae Emerges as DOE Feedstock of Choice for Biofuel 2.0; Chu Pledges $80 Million for Algae R&D - SolveClimate - Jan 15, 2010

- by Amy Westervelt -
http://solveclimate.com/blog/20100115/algae-emerges-doe-feed…

"There was a sense of deja vu in the biofuels sector this week when U.S. Energy Secretary Chu announced nearly $80 million in funding for research and development of algae-based fuels.

The dream of turning pond scum into diesel began with a similar flood of government investments by the Carter administration during the oil crisis of the 1970s. In fact, many of the buzzed-about algae-to-fuel startups today are basing their technology on seminal research from that era.

The government spending dried up after Carter left office, and research efforts suffered. Despite 30-plus years of work on a smaller scale since then and the fact that a wide range of backers, from the Silicon Valley venture community to major oil companies such as Chevron and Exxon, have begun investing heavily in the algae-based fuel business again over the last couple of years, a lot remains to be done before the potential of algae as a feedstock is realized.

Last year brought the closure of an early darling of the industry: GreenFuel, which grew out of research at MIT and planned to site its algae bioreactors next to coal plants, essentially using the coal emissions to grow algae that would in turn become fuel. Despite having made deals with several institutional clients in Europe and invested hundreds of millions in building pilot plants in the United States, the company couldn’t make the economics of its business pencil out, particularly once funding for its capital-intensive bioreactors dried up.

The sector still faces some major hurdles: figuring out which strains of algae are best suited to diesel production, deciding whether algae is best grown in giant (and expensive) bioreactors or in open ponds, and bringing down the cost of production.

According to Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones, founder of algae-based fuel company LiveFuels, which has partnered with the NREL scientists involved in the initial work in the 1970s, there are hundreds of thousands of strains of algae, and four algal genomes have been mapped. Each algae strain has particular characteristics that determine the type of fuel it could make: Strains high in fat are suitable for biodiesel, while strains high in carbohydrates are better for ethanol.

By even the most optimistic of predictions, however, actually producing fuel from algae at scale and at a cost that is palatable to consumers is a good 10 years away.

Nonetheless, the Department of Energy showed a preference for algae with this week's funding announcement.

It pledged $78 billion for two consortiums working on algae-based biofuel, including $44 million to the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts to develop "a systems approach for sustainable commercialization" of algae-based gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. One member of the NAABB is North Carolina-based Palmer Labs, which is working with rapid-growth algae and cyanobacteria to produce fuel at a scale to replace petroleum without infringing on fields that can be used for food production — avoiding one of the largest complaints about growing corn for ethanol.



"We take the biggest problems — currently in energy and food resources — and find cheaper and better solutions through innovative combinations of proven technologies," said Palmer Labs President Miles Palmer. "The DOE stimulus funds provide timely support of this pressing goal to us and our consortium partners."


The other group, the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is receiving up to $33.8 million to develop biomass-based hydrocarbon fuels that can work within the existing refining and distribution infrastructure.


"Biofuels must be compatible with the nation's engines, pipelines and refineries to play a substantial and effective role in reducing carbon emissions and reducing oil imports," explained Dale Gardner, associate director for renewable fuels and vehicles at NREL,making a not-so-subtle jab at ethanol, which is known to corrode engines (part of the reason the automotive industry has lobbied against expanding ethanol blend limits is concerns over the effect on vehicle engines).

"The Department of Energy's investment will allow NREL and the consortium to systematically identify and develop commercially sustainable biofuels from renewable sources for this critical energy supply."


The Other Biofuels

In 2009, it was still up for debate which of the biofuel 2.0 feedstocks would win out, with jatropha and algae jockeying for position as the best biodiesel feedstock and competing against cellulosic ethanol made from plant waste or rapidly renewable non-food crops. But this week, the only mention of another type of fuel was the $1.6 million distributed among the states to install or retrofit pumps at 60 gas stations to facilitate the distribution of E85 or other ethanol blends.

That investment in E85 infrastructure suggests that the EPA may be ready to move ahead with its intention, announced in December, to increase blend limits for ethanol from 10 to 15 percent, a move ethanol and farm groups have been lobbying for. Still, $1.6 million is a small amount compared with the $78 million for algae-based fuel.

Ethanol trade groups are worried about other changes. Ethanol trade groups Growth Energy and the Renewable Fuels Association have joined with state and local farm groups to sue the State of California over its low-carbon fuel standard, which is scheduled to be phased in beginning in 2011 and may set an example for future federal regulation.

The lawsuit claims that the standard unfairly discriminates against corn-based ethanol, and that its “indirect land use changes” component, which take into account shifts in land use elsewhere to grow food when U.S. cropland is used to grow fuel, "penalizes all corn ethanol based on the purported indirect effects of assumed farming practices that occur predominately outside California.” The ethanol groups further claim that “through the regulation, California seeks to curb or eliminate these farming practices throughout the United States and beyond by making the entire corn ethanol market responsible for them."

This is the same issue ethanol groups are raising with the EPA as it works to revise its biofuel rules to better regulate the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the production of alternative fuels.

The EPA is proposing an international indirect land-use changes component to the rules, which is being loudly protested by agriculture states and ethanol groups. Palmer Labs aims to solve that problem with its biofuels, and NREL also stresses that algae-based biofuel doesn't compete with food or livestock feed, that it can use marginal land and degraded water, and that it can make use of CO2 emissions.

However, ethanol has some powerful backers in Congress. U.S. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Collin Peterson (D-Minn.) secured a provision in the House-passed energy and climate bill that would block the EPA from regulating land-use-related emissions for six years.

Between the powerful agriculture-state politicians, farm groups and ethanol trade groups lobbying for increased use of ethanol and the genuine obstacles facing algae-based fuels, it remains to be seen whether algae will realize its potential this time around, or if we’ll just be left with another batch of promising research.
"
Masdar Institute, Boeing, Etihad Airways, and UOP Honeywell announce Sustainable Bioenergy Research Project in UAE, focused on salicornia as aviation biofuel - BD - Jan 18, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/18/masdar-institute-boe…
Renewable Energy Map launches — policies, expansion targets, current shares, installed capacity, current production - BD - Jan 18, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/18/renewable-energy-map…
www.ren21.net/map/??

"The Renewable Energy Policy Network (REN21), a global policy network that provides a forum for international leadership on renewable energy, has launched its Renewables Interactive Map.

The Map contains a wealth of information on renewable energy, including support policies, expansion targets, current shares, installed capacity, current production, future scenarios, and policy pledges.

The Map can be found on the REN21 website.

Designed as a central access-point to renewable energy information, the Map is dependent on the knowledge contributions of many organisations and individuals in the renewable energy community. REN21 strives to cite the sources for all the information presented, so that users can access further information directly.

The REN21 Secretariat collects the information from various reports, databases, news announcements, specific enquiries, and other sources. ??As the network of the renewable energy policy community, REN21 has provided authoritative information for several years, in particular through its Renewables Global Status Report.


As a new tool for REN21’s knowledge management, the Renewables Interactive Map is designed to track more closely the dynamic development of renewable energy policy-making and market development, and to provide disaggregated information for specific countries and technologies. "
OriginOil To Develop Sophisticated Algae Production Models; Global analytics partnership will provide firm basis for industry planning - Jan 26, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/originoil-to-develop-sophisti…
www.newswise.com/articles/view/560517/?sc=swhr;xy=5047780
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es902838n

"Los Angeles, CA January 26, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, today announced its partnership with StrategicFit, a London-based strategy consulting firm with world-class analytical capabilities. The starting point for the project is the lifecycle model that OriginOil presented to the National Algae Association Quarterly Conference last September, which showed for the first time that a properly sited industrial algae production system could be both profitable and beneficial.

“A recent study by researchers at the University of Virginia’s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering supported our finding that algae cultivated in a standalone agricultural environment cannot be viable,” said Riggs Eckelberry, OriginOil CEO. “This project will help our industry and its sponsors understand and prove what works.”

StrategicFit Co-Founder and Partner Duncan John said: “We have carefully explored the algae space and believe that there is real promise, but there can also be hype. Fact needs to be separated from fiction in order for the sector to build its credibility with investors, and we applaud OriginOil for taking the lead in driving for industry clarity and transparency."

StrategicFit’s people bring a wealth of knowledge to this partnership, drawing on past work with energy companies such as Royal Dutch Shell, BP, and Statoil; and technology companies such as Philips Electronics and Abbott Laboratories. This diverse experience, with a focus on the energy-sector, will help OriginOil identify key opportunities and challenges involved in commercializing its technology platform. The goal is to simplify strategic decision making through a rigorous quantitative analysis of the variables involved in algae production.”

The partnership will focus on increasing the robustness of the core Algae Productivity Model by refining underlying assumptions and process logic. The team has already upgraded the model from a complex Excel worksheet to Analytica, a sophisticated platform with a modular format and an accessible user interface. Time sensitivity will now be added to the model, with a 20-year horizon that includes discounted cash flow variables, time for R&D and scale-up, and ROI estimates based on a waterfall analysis.

Moving forward, the model will address synergistic applications for algae production, including wastewater treatment, natural gas fired kilns, biodiesel refining, and ethanol distillation. The final model will be broken down into web-based analytical modules and will also available by application to the OriginOil Partner Network.


OriginOil CEO Riggs Eckelberry concluded: “We look forward to working with StrategicFit to further refine the Algae Productivity Model. As we continue to develop our technology and prepare for commercial transition, it is critical that we have a viable tool for our partner network to use in strategic decision making. StrategicFit will help us identify and evaluate options to increase value, and improve our business case.”



About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 38.813.291 von Popeye82 am 26.01.10 13:59:33

da werden sie ja scheinbar demnächst erstmals "Butter bei die Fische" geben:

"... Time sensitivity will now be added to the model, with a 20-year horizon that includes discounted cash flow variables, time for R&D and scale-up, and ROI estimates based on a waterfall analysis. ..."
Camelina on the rise; Aviation biofuels darling doubling acreage in 2010; modeled "at parity with $70 oil"; Q&A with Great Plains CEO Sam Huttenbauer - BD - Jan 21, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/21/great-plains-doublin…
Today in Biofuels Opinion: “We believe that biofuel produced by algae could be a meaningful part of the solution.” - BD - Jan 21, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/21/today-in-biofuels-op…

"Emil Jacobs, VP of research and development for Exxon Mobil:We believe that biofuel produced by algae could be a meaningful part of the solution in the future to produce an economically viable, low net carbon emission transportation fuel. Meeting our many energy challenges requires a multidimensional approach.


An open letter to the American Farm Bureau from members of the Union of Concerned Scientists: “As scientists concerned about the grave risks that climate change poses to the world and U.S. agriculture, we are disappointed that the American Farm Bureau has chosen to officially deny the existence of human-caused climate change when the evidence of it has never been clearer.” "
Desert Bioenergy, Alga Fuels, Bal Biofuels and Chilean government launch $30 million advanced biofuels research effort - BD - Jan 21, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/01/21/desert-bioenergy-alg…

"In Chile, the Energy Minister, Marcelo Tokman, announced a $30 million investment in advanced biofuels research, commencing in 2010 and funded by the national government ($9 million), as well as Desert Bioenergy, Alga Fuels, and Bal Biofuels.

The research effort will focus on algal fuels, among other next-generation options, and will identify opportunities for Chile to increase its energy independence. "
Neue Treibstoffe für bessere Öko-Bilanz beim Fliegen

Berlin (dpa) - Erdgas und Biomasse können nach Angaben des Deutschen Zentrums für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) den Flugzeug-Treibstoff Kerosin in Zukunft weitgehend ersetzen.

Treibstoffe auf Gas-Basis seien nicht allein eine Alternative für Erdöl, aus dem Kerosin hergestellt wird. Sie würden zum Beispiel durch einen geringeren Rußanteil auch umweltfreundlicher, sagte DLR-Forscher Manfred Aigner am Mittwoch in Berlin."Wir müssen die heutigen Nachteile beim Fliegen lösen, wenn wir in Zukunft noch so fliegen wollen wie heute", sagte Aigner. Bei neuen Entwicklungen seien deshalb auch ökologische Aspekte - inklusive Lärmentwicklung - und die gesellschaftliche Akzeptanz eines Grundstoffs zu berücksichtigen, ergänzte DLR-Vorstandschef Johann- Dietrich Wörner.

Für die Praxis heißt das: Flugzeuge, die mit neuer Treibstoff- und Antriebstechnik ein wenig langsamer fliegen, aber dafür eine deutlich bessere Öko-Bilanz aufweisen, könnten im Wettbewerb die Nase vorn haben. Da Erdöl langfristig gesehen eine endliche Ressource ist, führt an neuen Treibstoffen für Flieger ohnehin kein Weg vorbei. Weit sind die Forscher bei der Entwicklung eines synthetischen Treibstoffs, der aus Erdgas gewonnen wird. Ein Teil der Praxistests läuft im arabischen Emirat Katar.


Dabei wird Gas durch spezielle Verfahren zu Treibstoff verflüssigt. Noch wird das neue Produkt dem klassischen Kerosin beigemischt. Im Oktober vergangenen Jahres startete ein erster kommerzieller Linienflug von Qatar Airways mit einem Treibstoffgemisch - zur Hälfte aus Kerosin, zur Hälfte aus verflüssigtem Erdgas. Das heißt dann "Gas to Liquid", kurz GtL. Die DLR hält die Preise dafür inzwischen für marktfähig, allein Katar produziere bereits rund ein Million Tonnen GtL pro Jahr.

Bei Biomasse als Flieger-Treibstoff wird die Entwicklung wohl noch 10 bis 20 Jahre dauern. Gesucht wird noch nach einem Verfahren, das beim Anbau von Pflanzen keine Konkurrenz für die Lebensmittel- Produktion ist. Zur Zeit gelten Algenfarmen als denkbares Modell. Algen wachsen schnell und brauchen keinen Ackerboden.

Nach DLR- Angaben gibt es für Flugzeuge heute auch einen Treibstoff, der aus Kohle gewonnen wird. Er sei etwas teurer als Kerosin. Dabei falle aber deutlich mehr umweltschädliches Kohlenstoffdioxid (CO2) an als bei Tankfüllungen auf Gas-Basis.
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 38.825.466 von Pank24 am 27.01.10 19:13:48Hallo Pank!

Gas ist sicher eine Alternative - aber nur eine mittelfristige. Vorteil ist wie genannt die bessere Umweltbilanz im Vergleich zu Öl.

Gas und Biomasse kann ich allerdings nicht als Gesamtlösung ansehen: das eine ist selber fossil und wird umso schneller verbraucht werden, je mehr man vom öl auf Gas umschwenkt. Das andere ist noch nicht in relevanten Mengen vorhanden.

Was machen eigentlich diese ganzen Biofuelfirmen? Gibt es schon eine die Gewinne macht? Habe das in letzter Zeit nicht mehr so verfolgt.

MfG
Asset
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 38.829.746 von Assetpfleger am 28.01.10 11:48:07Es gibt keine Gesamtloesung. Aber die Algengeschichte sieht schoing ganz gut aus.

Zu den EROEI Gutachten.
Es kommt dann meistens noch drauf an wer das Gutachten in Auftrag gibt.
Das Spiel ist bereits beim Elektrosmog bekannt.
Es gibt kein Gutachten zu dem man kein Gegengutachten erstellen koennte.Meine Meinung dazu, in bestimmten Bereichen ist sogar ein EROEI unter 1 sinnvoll, zum Beispiel Flugverkehr.

Jedenfalls kann ich mir keine Kommerzielle Luftfahrt mit Elekroakkus vorstellen.
Und auch mit Gas oder Wasserstoffgeschichten tu ich mir noch ein wenig schwer.

Voelliger Unsinn waere der Einsatzt in Oelheizungen oder Kraftwerken, was jedoch geschieht.

Benzin und Dieselund Heizoel hat einen EROEI von 1 bis 3 bis es beim Endverbraucher ankommt.

Das wird jedoch gerne unterschagen. Ganz so sinnvoll ist der EROEI dann meistens auch nicht, Ethanolwerke stellen noch Tierfutter und Duenger her.
Eine anrechnung des Energieverbrauchs auf die einzelnen Bereiche ist nicht immer so einfach.
Ökologischer Pfotenabdruck

Schlechte Umweltbilanz: Eine Dogge soll schädlicher sein als ein Geländewagen, ein Goldfisch so belastend wie ein Mobiltelefon. Das behaupten zwei neuseeländische Autoren.


Ein mittelgroßer Hund belastet die Umwelt stärker als ein Geländewagen. Das behaupten die neuseeländischen Autoren Brenda und Robert Vale, nachdem sie den ökologischen Fußabdruck mehrerer Haustiere mit dem Energiebedarf von Autos und Elektrogeräten verglichen haben. Der ökologische Fußabdruck beschreibt die Fläche, die ein Lebewesen zum Erhalt seines Lebensstandards benötigt, unter anderem für die Produktion seiner Nahrung.

Die Autoren des Buches "Time to eat the dog", als Architekten spezialisiert auf nachhaltiges Wohnen, gestehen einem mittelgroßen Hund im Jahr 164 Kilogramm Frischfleisch und 95 Kilogramm Getreideprodukte zu. Ein Kilo Hähnchenfleisch lässt sich auf einer Fläche von 43,3 Quadratmeter produzieren, ein Kilo Getreide auf 13,4. Demnach betrage der ökologische Fußabdruck eines mittelgroßen Hundes 8400 Quadratmeter pro Jahr, haben Brenda und Robert Vale errechnet.

Im Vergleich dazu benötige man 55,1 Gigajoule Energie, um einen Toyota Land Cruiser zu bauen und ihn in einem Jahr 10.000 Kilometer zu fahren. Da ein Hektar Land eine Biomasse liefert, die einem Energieertrag von 135 Gigajoule entspreche, habe der Geländewagen einen ökologischen Fußabdruck von 4100 Quadratmetern - also nur knapp halb so viel wie ein Hund. Auch Katzen sind nach Ansicht der Autoren nur bedingt zu empfehlen, denn mit 1500 Quadratmeter Fläche liegt der ökologische Fußabdruck einer Katze nur knapp unter dem eines VW Golf



Von Katrin Blawat

Schlechte Umweltbilanz: Eine Dogge soll schädlicher sein als ein Geländewagen, ein Goldfisch so belastend wie ein Mobiltelefon. Das behaupten zwei neuseeländische Autoren.
Hund vor einem Auto, dpa

Hund oder Zweitwagen sollte es nach Ansicht der neuseeländischen Autoren heißen. Denn das Futter mache die Hundehaltung ökologisch teuer. Foto: dpa

Ein mittelgroßer Hund belastet die Umwelt stärker als ein Geländewagen. Das behaupten die neuseeländischen Autoren Brenda und Robert Vale, nachdem sie den ökologischen Fußabdruck mehrerer Haustiere mit dem Energiebedarf von Autos und Elektrogeräten verglichen haben. Der ökologische Fußabdruck beschreibt die Fläche, die ein Lebewesen zum Erhalt seines Lebensstandards benötigt, unter anderem für die Produktion seiner Nahrung.

Die Autoren des Buches "Time to eat the dog", als Architekten spezialisiert auf nachhaltiges Wohnen, gestehen einem mittelgroßen Hund im Jahr 164 Kilogramm Frischfleisch und 95 Kilogramm Getreideprodukte zu. Ein Kilo Hähnchenfleisch lässt sich auf einer Fläche von 43,3 Quadratmeter produzieren, ein Kilo Getreide auf 13,4. Demnach betrage der ökologische Fußabdruck eines mittelgroßen Hundes 8400 Quadratmeter pro Jahr, haben Brenda und Robert Vale errechnet.

Im Vergleich dazu benötige man 55,1 Gigajoule Energie, um einen Toyota Land Cruiser zu bauen und ihn in einem Jahr 10.000 Kilometer zu fahren. Da ein Hektar Land eine Biomasse liefert, die einem Energieertrag von 135 Gigajoule entspreche, habe der Geländewagen einen ökologischen Fußabdruck von 4100 Quadratmetern - also nur knapp halb so viel wie ein Hund. Auch Katzen sind nach Ansicht der Autoren nur bedingt zu empfehlen, denn mit 1500 Quadratmeter Fläche liegt der ökologische Fußabdruck einer Katze nur knapp unter dem eines VW Golf.


Das Fleisch im Futter sei es, was Hund und Katze die Bilanz vermiese, schreiben die Neuseeländer. Wer sich diese Haustiere hält, solle im Gegenzug entweder selbst Vegetarier werden oder auf einen Zweitwagen verzichten. Eine halbwegs umweltverträgliche Lösung seien aber auch Kleintiere wie ein Hamster.

Dessen ökologischer Fußabdruck von 140 Quadratmetern könne der Halter mit dem Verzicht auf einen Plasma-Fernseher ausgleichen. Und wer die Gesellschaft eines Goldfisches höher schätzt als zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation, der müsse lediglich sowohl auf sein Privat- als auch auf sein Diensthandy verzichten, und schon habe er die umgerechnet 3,4 Quadratmeter Fläche wieder wettgemacht, die sein Goldfisch der Erde abtrotzt.

Rückendeckung vor allem für Hundehalter kommt von Niels Jungbluth, Umweltingenieur und Geschäftsführer des auf Ökobilanzen spezialisierten Schweizer Unternehmens Esu-Services. "Haustiere sind unter ökologischen Aspekten nicht vernachlässigbar, aber ich bezweifle, dass sie die Umwelt stärker belasten als ein Auto." Tierfutter werde ausschließlich aus Schlachtabfällen hergestellt, sagt Jungbluth. "Aber man züchtet die Schlachttiere für den Bedarf des Menschen, da hat das Tierfutter nur einen geringen Anteil an der Umweltbelastung." Und berücksichtigt man dies, reduziere sich der Fußabdruck eines Hundes von 8400 auf 2000 Quadratmeter.


"Stärker als die Inhaltsstoffe fällt die Verpackung des Futters ins Gewicht", sagt Jungbluth, vor allem, wenn der Mensch das Menü aus kleinen Konservendosen serviere. Überhaupt, der Mensch, speziell der im Westen lebende: Mit etwa 47.000 Quadratmeter beansprucht er eine Fläche, die selbst einen Bernhardiner genügsam erscheinen lässt.

Statt sich in komplizierte Zahlenspiele zu vertiefen, haben Brenda und Robert Vale praxisnahe Vorschläge für umweltbewusste Haustierhalter. Hunde beispielsweise gäben sich auch mit vegetarischem Futter zufrieden. Am besten beschränke man sich aber auf Haustiere, die einen Zusatznutzen bringen, wie Hühner, die immerhin Eier legen, oder, für Fleischfreunde, auf Kaninchen. Denn die können 36 Nachkommen im Jahr bekommen, die sich zu 72 Kilogramm Sonntagsbraten verarbeiten lassen. Nur wie das geht, verraten die Autoren nicht: Rezepte zur Zubereitung von Nagern, Hund oder Katze fehlen.


Quelle
http://www.sueddeutsche.de/wissen/698/494039/text/
OriginOil Turns Corner to Commercialization, Unveils In-House Pilot System; Suite of breakthrough technologies now combined for end-to-end algae-to-oil production - Feb 12, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/originoil-turns-corner-to-com…
http://vimeo.com/9123970
http://picasaweb.google.com/proteanwork/OriginOilPilotPlantU…
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/los_ang…
www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60S4PM20100129?feedType=RSS&f…

"Los Angeles, CA February 1, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, unveiled a comprehensive pilot system for algae growth and harvesting at an exclusive event held at its Los Angeles headquarters on Thursday, January 28.

At the event, Riggs Eckelberry, OriginOil CEO, spoke to the assembled group of core investors, celebrities and members of the press. “I’m very proud of our team that has worked so hard over the months to make our technologies work in a complete pilot system,” he said. “Until now we have been in pure research and development. Now we have turned the corner to commercialization of our technologies. It’s a historic milestone for us.”

Riggs Eckelberry’s speech and photos from the event can be viewed here: video, photos. Media coverage included KABC-TV Channel 7 in prime time, and Reuters newswire.

Sipping algae martinis :laugh: and nibbling at raw treats, guests also viewed the company’s Live Extraction system, designed to “milk” algae oil without destroying algae cultures, and a bioreactor prototype specifically designed for wastewater applications.

“Algae will be local,” Eckelberry concluded. “Unlike today’s centralized energy systems, algae will go wherever the CO2 is, and that’s everywhere.” He continued, “Algae systems will be attached to wastewater plants, factories, breweries, and any other location that generates CO2. This will lead to highly distributed energy production model and will truly deliver the jobs creation that we so urgently need in this country and the world.”

At the heart of the new system is a series of 200-gallon tanks which can be individually configured and managed for various strains, growth strategies, and lighting geometries. The tanks are now illuminated with LED light sticks submerged in icicle-like arrays. A stirrer circulates the algae slowly around the lights.

Once the algae reaches harvest concentration it is sent to the integrated extraction system, a combination of ultrasound generation and low-power electromagnetic pulsing (time-lapse video). This new system has a throughput of 5 gallons per minute, which easily keeps up with the daily output of the pilot system. After extraction, a series of settling tanks separates the oils and biomass for eventual use as fuel and valuable by-products. A water recycling system completes the loop so the process can start again. (Diagram)

The company’s Dynamic Control System manages the operation of the growth phase, releasing CO2 and other nutrients as the algae needs it. While bottled CO2 is currently used, an in-house generator is planned to test real-world scenarios where exhaust gas is processed for its CO2.



About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 38.855.007 von Popeye82 am 01.02.10 14:35:35

der Reuters Artikel dazu:

OriginOil CEO expects revenue in 2011; U.S. algae biofuel start-up OriginOil expects to start generating revenue in 2011 as the renewable energy firm starts to lease devices to extract oil from algae for fuel and other products, its chief executive said on Thursday - Reuters, LOS ANGELES - Feb 1, 2010
www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE60S4PM20100129?feedType=RSS&f…

"Chief Executive Riggs Eckelberry said the company may see some revenue from services this year but said the firm is not rushing to produce revenue and has not disclosed when it expects to turn a profit.

"There's a rush to getting it right," Eckelberry said, referring to finding an affordable way to convert algae to fuel on a commercial scale.

OriginOil, which trades on the over-the-counter bulletin board, is among a slew of algae-to-energy companies working to replace traditional fossil fuel with fuel made from lowly pond scum.

The emerging sector has drawn attention from oil giants Exxon Mobil Corp, Chevron Corp and BP Plc as well as the U.S. military and investors.

Yet the fledgling industry faces a series of hurdles to compete with traditional fossil fuels -- from finding the best strain of pond scum to developing efficient ways to harvest oil.

At OriginOil's warehouse in Los Angeles where 1,200 gallons of algae brew in vats, Eckelberry said the technology issues are largely resolved. What's needed, he said, is for different players to combine their methods so that the industry can take off.

"It's not going to be one company," Eckelberry said. "The Internet showed us that at the end of the day, it's this cacophony of all these technologies."

The executive sees OriginOil's place in the industry as an Intel -- selling or licensing its black boxes that emit electromagnetic pulses, zapping algae so that the oil, water and biomass separate and making the harvest faster and more energy-efficient.

The company has developed other components, such as bioreactors, to optimize the entire process of producing algae-based biofuel. Eckelberry said the components are designed to work with different types of algae.

"We want to be the Switzerland of strains," :laugh: he added.


Shares of OriginOil ended trade on Thursday at 28 cents each, against a 12-month high of 48 cents and a low of 22 cents. "
Free Research: Outlook for Cellulosic Ethanol from Global Data - Research Recap - Feb 2, 2010
www.researchrecap.com/index.php/2010/02/01/free-research-out…
www.alacrastore.com/acm/2085_sample.pdf
www.alacrastore.com/storecontent/GlobalData-Cellulosic_Ethan…

"Cellulosic ethanol has been touted as one of the most appealing alternative energy sources of the future. The financial crisis has slowed development of this “second generation” bioethanol, but Global Data believes the industry is poised for growth as the world economy recovers and credit conditions improve. We are pleased to offer a complimentary download of Global Data’s $500 report on the sector via the Alacra Store.


Selected excerpts:


Cellulosic ethanol is a ‘Second generation’ bioethanol produced using advanced processing techniques from non edible feedstock. Cellulosic ethanol also called ‘cellanol’ is produced from biomass including waste from urban, agricultural, and forestry sources which are available in abundance. The technology is presently in the nascent stage with a total production capacity of 57.37 million liters. The total production capacity which is currently online is either in the ‘pilot’ or the ‘demonstration’ stage.

The technology is yet to have a commercial launch. However, there are close to thirty plants globally which are either at the planning or construction phase of which some are expected to be online in 2010.


"The cellulosic ethanol industry is poised to grow with feasible renewable energy policies, financial support, strong political will, and commercial scale technology that can generate better return on investment. "




The global economic recession has created a lack of credit availability which has led to the stressed operations and delay in commercialization of various cellulosic ethanol plants. There is profound impact of the financial crisis on the industry because most of the banks and FI’s are reluctant to invest in a nascent technology and the credit lines have been squeezed. The industry failed to attract large foreign investment, lack of capital for expansion and commercial deployment has also affected the industry. The recession has also led to a decline in ethanol prices which made its production less profitable for the producers.

Although the economic recession has restrained the growth of the ethanol market, the market is expected to grow at an accelerated rate during the recovery complemented by rising investments.

This report has been made available free of charge to Research Recap users for 30 days by special arrangement with Global Data, an Alacra content partner. After 30 days, the report will revert to its regular Alacra Store price of $500.00)

For additional free research reports from the Alacra Store click here:
www.alacrastore.com/free-research "
$21 billion Shell, Cosan biofuels deal announced: industry's largest merger, ever; Companies will form Brazilian ethanol JV and contribute $9 billion in cash and assets; 800 Mgy increase in ethanol capacity - BD, RIO DE JANEIRO - Feb 2, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/02/shell-cosan-announce…
http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/20100201…

"In Brazil, Royal Dutch Shell announced an MOU with Cosan (CZZ) to make the largest investment in the history of biofuels:eek:, with an agreement to establish a 50-50 Brazilian ethanol joint venture with Cosan which will own 4,500 retail stations, sugar, ethanol, fuel distribution and power generation, and the Shell aviation fuel distribution business.

The companies said that they plan to increase the venture’s ethanol production levels from 529 Mgy to 1323 Mgy, which would make the venture one of the top three ethanol producers in the world, after Archer Daniels Midland and POET in the US. Shell downstream chief Mark Williams told Reuters that the company would

Under the terms of the proposed agreement, Cosan will merge its entire business into the as-yet unnamed JV, while Shell will contribute its retail, aviation distribution, and will invest up to $1.63 billion in capital into the venture. Overall, Cosan assets are valued at $4.93 billion, including its 60 million tones in sugar cane crushing capacity, and Shell’s retail and aviation marketing units are valued at $3 billion.

As announced, the enterprise will become the third-largest fuel distributor in Brazil, and will have combined annual sales of $21 billion, and an asset value of $9.56 billion. Cosan previously acquired ExxonMobil’s retail marketing unit, which operated 1500 stations, in 2008, for $1 billion, and acquired 83 Petrosul stations in December for $40 million.

The deal continues a trend of major agricultural and oil refining companies moving into Brazilian ethanol. Last month, Bunge announced that it would acquire sugar and ethanol producer Moema for $452 million, while in October Louis Dreyfus acquired 423 Mgy in annual ethanol capacity with the acquisition of Santelisa Vale, and has $4.6 billion in assets in its LDC-SEV Brazilian ethanol entity. Dreyfus, which injected $463 million into the venture, said it expected to have an IPO between 2012 and 2014.

Last October, BP said that it will commence production of cellulosic ethanol from biomass in Brazil in 2013. BP has a cellulosic ethanol joint venture, Vercipia, with Verenium, and, according to Valor Online that “the first plant for producing second generation ethanol will be constructed in the United States in 2010, with the technology being transferred to BP’s plants in Brazil after operations commence at the U.S. facility.”

In April 2008, BP invested $560 million for a 50 percent stake in Tropical Bioenergia, a joint venture with Santelisa Vale and Maeda Group that is building 370 Mgy in sugar cane ethanol capacity in Goias state.


Brazil, which produces 7 billion gallons of ethanol per year, has 15 million ethanol-based or flex-fuel cars. "
Consolidated bioprocessing is the most promising biofuels processing technology: industry poll - BD - Feb 2, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/02/consolidated-bioproc…

"In Florida, biofuels industry executives said that consolidated bioprocessing — including the production of ethanol and renewable fuels my microbes — is the most promising biofuels processing technology, in a Biofuels Digest poll.

29 percent of poller respondents selected CBP as “the most promising”, followed by pyrolysis (22 percent), Fischer-Tropsh process (19 percent), enzymatic or acid hydrolysis (19 percent). Gasification, with 11 percent of the votes, came in last.
"
DOE requests $28.4 billion for FY’11 budget; no increase for bioenergy, but big increases for ARPA-E, EFRC and Energy Innovation Hubs - BD - Feb 2, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/02/doe-requests-28-4-bi…
www.mbe.doe.gov/budget/11budget/Content/Approstat.pdf

"In Washington, US Energy Secretary Steven Chu today detailed President Barack Obama’s $28.4 billion Fiscal Year 2011 budget request for the Department of Energy. The FY 2011 budget request includes more than $217 million in new funding for science research and discovery, including an additional $40 million for the existing Energy Frontier Research Centers program and $107 million for Energy Innovation Hubs. Also, $300 million was requested for the Advanced Research Project Agency – Energy (ARPA-E), and lending authority to support approximately $40 billion in loan guarantees for innovative clean energy programs.

Overall, within energy efficiency and renewable energy (EERE), the biomass program received a zero increase over the 2010 appropriation of $220 million, while all other areas besides water power in EERE received increases. The solar request jumped 22.4 percent to $302 million, while wind was increased 53.1 percent to $122 million. Under the “Regaining our ENERGY Science and Engineering Edge” (RE-ENERGYSE) program, the Department of Energy (DOE) aims to use $50 million in FY 2011 to educate future leaders in energy science and technology and to build a highly skilled clean-energy workforce. The request also includes $39.5 million for a Energy systems integration facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado. "
Obama revises Biofuels policy - addresses financing, RFS2 - BD, WASHINGON - Feb 3, 2010
http://twitter.com/bdigest

"WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama today announced a series of steps his Administration is taking as part of its comprehensive strategy to enhance American energy independence while building a foundation for a new clean energy economy, and its promise of new industries and millions of jobs.

At a meeting with a bipartisan group of governors from around the country, the President laid out three measures that will work in concert to boost biofuels production and reduce our dangerous dependence on foreign oil. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has finalized a rule to implement the long-term renewable fuels standard of 36 billion gallons by 2022 established by Congress. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has proposed a rule on the Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) that would provide financing to increase the conversion of biomass to bioenergy. The President's Biofuels Interagency Working Group released its first report - Growing America's Fuel. The report, authored by group co-chairs, Secretaries Vilsack and Chu, and Administrator Jackson, lays out a strategy to advance the development and commercialization of a sustainable biofuels industry to meet or exceed the nation's biofuels targets.

In addition, President Obama announced a Presidential Memorandum (linked below) creating an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage to develop a comprehensive and coordinated federal strategy to speed the development and deployment of clean coal technologies. Our nation's economy will continue to rely on the availability and affordability of domestic coal for decades to meet its energy needs, and these advances are necessary to reduce pollution in the meantime. The President calls for five to ten commercial demonstration projects to be up and running by 2016.

President Obama said, "Now, I happen to believe that we should pass a comprehensive energy and climate bill. It will make clean energy the profitable kind of energy, and the decision by other nations to do this is already giving their businesses a leg up on developing clean energy jobs and technologies. But even if you disagree on the threat posed by climate change, investing in clean energy jobs and businesses is still the right thing to do for our economy. Reducing our dependence on foreign oil is still the right thing to do for our security. We can't afford to spin our wheels while the rest of the world speeds ahead."

"Advancing biomass and biofuel production holds the potential to create green jobs, which is one of the many ways the Obama Administration is working to rebuild and revitalize rural America," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. "Facilities that produce renewable fuel from biomass have to be designed, built and operated. Additionally, BCAP will stimulate biomass production and that will benefit producers and provide the materials necessary to generate clean energy and reduce carbon pollution."

"President Obama and this Administration are strongly committed to the development of carbon capture and storage technology as a key part of the clean energy economy. We can and should lead the world in this technology and the jobs it can create," said Energy Secretary Steven Chu.

"The actions President Obama has taken today will create jobs, slash greenhouse gas emissions and increase our energy security while helping to put America at the leading edge of the new energy economy," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. "The renewable fuel standards will help bring new economic opportunity to millions of Americans, particularly in rural America. EPA is proud to be a part of the President's effort to combat climate change and put Americans back to work - both through the new renewable fuel standards and through our co-chairmanship with the Department of Energy of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage." "
LS9, Algenol projects get the green light in Florida; More advanced biofuels head for the Sunshine State; largest algae, renewable diesel demos to start production in 2010 - BD - Feb 3, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/03/ls9-algenol-biofuels…
www.news-press.com/article/20100203/GREEN/2030388/1075/Algen…

"In Florida, algal ethanol and renewable drop-in fuels advanced suddenly in the Sunshine State with the approval of a $10 million Lee County incentive for Algenol that will bring the company’s research laboratory, new corporate headquarters and production facility to South Florida.

On the other side of the state, LS9 announced that they have selected an existing site in Okeechobee for a 100,000 gallon pilot plant opening this year, that could be expanded to 10 Mgy as soon as 2012.


The Algenol project

Algenol will now move into a 43,000 square foot facility near Fort Myers, that in addition to serving as company headquarters will serve as a pilot production plant, producing 300,000 gallons of ethanol per year, or three times the production at the pilot plant being built in Freeport, Texas in partnership with Dow (a project which recently was awarded a $25 million grant by the DOE as one of 19 integrated biorefinery pilot and demonstration projects). CEO Paul Woods told local media that the company will move into its new facility by May and will commence production of ethanol by August. The project will bring 100 new jobs to Florida, including 50 transferred from the company’s labs in Baltimore.

The 3-2 vote in favor of Algenol by county commissioners was described as a “nail biter” by Woods, owing to a controversy over whether the $25 million county reserves fund could be used to support capital investment projects, even those with a job creation element. “It’s a really powerful move forward and I’m proud to be part of it,” said Woods told the News-Press.


The LS9 project

LS9 announced the acquisition of the former Biomass Processing Technology production facility in Okeechobee, Florida. The facility will be retrofitted to accommodate LS9’s one-step fermentation process, and will initially support the production of 50,000-100,000 gallons of LS9s UltraClean Diesel branded fuel, by late-2010. LS9 CEO Bill Haywood, speaking to the Digest about the project, said that the Florida site, on a six-acre site at the Larsen Dairy, 70 miles west of West Palm Beach, was chosen because it met the project goals of being in “close proximity to feedstocks, keeping costs down, and allowing us to get this incredible technology into the market in the most efficient way.”

Haywood said that original cost to build the BPT plant was as high as $80 million, but that LS9 was able to purchase it out of bankruptcy for “around $2 million”, and that the extensive system of fermenters and other equipment meant that the company would need to do “minimal retrofitting” and would be in production in July at what he described as “the world’s largest demo plant for advanced renewable diesel.” Haywood confirmed that the site has the potential, because of the large-scale fermenters and other equipment on the property (which filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2008) to support 10 Mgy in production capacity, noting that the site has four 250,000 gallon fermenters already in place.

Haywood said that, although LS9 uses e.coli as a microorganism instead of yeast, the process of fermentation is not markedly different than the process of ethanol production, but confirmed that, in the long run, the LS9 process could support continuous production, instead of batch style production as is used in ethanol production, because the e.coli secrete diesel through the cell walls and the product is not toxic to the organism. “That’s for the future,” Haywood cautioned.

LS9 said that it expects to create 15-20 operations jobs throughout the demonstration period alone, and 30-50 construction jobs over the six month retrofit period. The company will also create local opportunities with feedstock providers, and has secured cane syrup for the demonstration period although the company said that discussions are still in progress regarding long-term contracts to supply feedstock for an expansion of the plant to 10 Mgy, which could be completed by the end of 2011. As far as off-take, Haywood said “we have at least three oil and gags companies who have told us, “let us known when you make it and we will come and take it off your hands.”

In addition to demonstration scale equipment, the new facility will house lab and pilot scale operations that LS9 will use to test and integrate cellulosic materials such as wood chips and agricultural waste into its production process. The use of cellulosic biomass will lead to even greater reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.


Florida as an advanced biofuels production center

“Why don’t we have more renewable energy here? We’re the Sunshine State,” Florida Governor Charlie Crist is known to say with an easy charm that has won a lot of votes over the years. The state has been quietly piling up a number of notable advanced biofuels pilots and, with these announcements, five of the top 30 companies in the “50 Hottest Companies in Bioenergy” now have pilot projects in Florida.

Verenium is developing a commercial site near Lake Okeechobee, Petro Algae has its commercial sales center and demonstration farm in Fellsmere, and an unmarked set of raceways and paddle wheels on the north side of Vero Beach is an Aurora Biofuels pilot plant.

However, not every Florida advanced biofuel project has had success. A multi-million dollar 2007 DOE grant went to Alico for a cellulosic ethanol demonstration project, which was ultimately abandoned. Last year, when algae pioneer Algenol, based on the west coast in Naples, announced a possible move to Texas based on the importance of its Dow project in Freeport, the Lee County development officer, when contacted by the local paper for comment, said she had never heard of the company.

One thing is sure, Lee County has heard of Algenol now. "
Missouri researchers develop algal fuels ecosystem using brine shrimp, tilapia - BD - Feb 3, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/03/missouri-researchers…

"In Missouri, researchers at the University of Missouri have released details of an ecosystem for producing renewable fuel oil from harvested brine shrimp, which in turn consume algae cultivated in open raceway ponds adjacent to a 50 MW natural gas power plant.

The researchers say that brine shrimp take care of the problem of harvesting algae, and themselves are separated by more traditional processes into oils, proteins, and waste matter that can be converted to biogas via anaerobic digestion. The system can produce up to 500 gallons of biodiesel per acre, according to the research team. Tilapia are also introduced into the system to consume excess algae as well as other microorganisms, and keep the system productive and water clean. "
Meinungen von einem Haufen CEO´s:

Today in Biofuels Opinion: Reaction to Obama Administration on new biofuels policies, EPA, USDA rules - BD - Feb 4, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/04/today-in-biofuels-op…
What's Next?; Industry leaders discuss future moves, in wake of Obama's major shift on biofuels policy - BD, WASHINGTON - Feb 5, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/05/what-next-biofuels-i…
http://bio.org/ind/EconomicImpactAdvancedBiofuels.pdf

"In Washington, the Biotechnology Industry Organization followed up on a shift in US biofuels policy with a call for four new steps it said would increase the pace of biofuels commercialization.

BIO called for:

+ Revising the risk assessment process for advanced biofuels projects in the current Department of Energy loan guarantee program;

+ Double funding for U.S. Department of Agriculture programs to deploy cellulosic feedstocks; include eligibility for value-added biobased materials, products and chemicals;

+ Funding the reverse auction for cellulosic biofuels already incorporated in law;

+ Funding development and deployment programs for biobased products and renewable specialty chemicals.


“The Obama administration correctly recognizes that large-scale production of advanced biofuels can be a significant driver of green job creation, energy security and greenhouse gas reductions,” said BIO executive VP Brent Erickson. “We applaud the policy initiatives announced yesterday, which call for federal coordination of programs to help integrate the complete biofuel value chain. This is a good first step in helping to stimulate the private investment needed to build new biorefineries. However, more needs to be done to de-risk investment in new technologies so that they can scale up to meet national goals. Congress can take action to ensure that these programs are adequately funded and targeted so that the effort will stimulate additional private capital investment.”

BIO recently projected that development of advanced biorefineries could create as many as 29,000 jobs over the next few years. The report, U.S. Economic Impact of Advanced Biofuels Production, is available for download here.


Meanwhile, in Colorado, ZeaChem CEO Jim Imbler repeated his call for national governments to adopt a more sophisticated subsidy program, where subsidies would be linked to a floor price for oil, and the industry would be eligible for subsidies only if the price of oil dropped below a target price in the $70-$75 per barrel range, at which point many developing, advanced biofuels companies would become uncompetitive (Note: ZeaChem’s fuels is modeled on a break-even in the $50 per barrel range).

“The fact is that what the industry really needs is not protection from the market, but protection from oil price volatility,” Imbler said. He noted that the price of oil had swung between highs of $145 per barrel and lows of $35 per barrel in the past two years, and added, “those conditions make investors highly nervous, and a floor price subsidy has worked in other industries to provide protection against that kind of risk.”

He added that what the industry needed, primarily, was long-term price stability, or a floor price subsidy that would assist in generating stability if the market itself could not provide it. “If you can’t make money on $100 oil, then there’s something wrong with your business model, and there’s no need to provide a subsidy when oil is at that price.” Imbler agreed that, with inflation over time, the floor price subsidy would eventually become obsolete — for example, if a floor price had been set in the 1970s it might have been in the $15-$20 per barrel range, a price floor that would not be reached and trigger subsidy payments today.

“Just having the floor price,” noted Imbler, “you might not even have to make subsidy payments, and still you would be giving certainty to investors against downside market risk that the [biofuels] industry has no control over.” Imbler said that financing was a major challenge for the industry, given the economic conditions, and financing demonstration and commercial-scale plants required operators to de-risk the investment by securing long-term feedstock contracts with dedicated energy crops and proving their technologies at scale. But downstream end-user market price risk, which depended on oil price volatility, was of great concern to investors.


Asked if his team was celebrating after the news of a shift in Obama Administration biofuels policy, Imbler said “We’re not going to do any celebrating until we have completed our new plant construction later this year, and demonstrated our technology at scale.”

In California, biobutanol pioneer Cobalt Technologies’ CEO, Rick Wilson, welcomed the shift in biofuels policy, saying that “it validates the fuel route for butanol. He said that the policy shift would help make more believers in the investment community and called the announcements “a great day for biobutanol,” yet expressed surprise over thaw announcements because, although the USDA had expressed enthusiasm for biobutanol in meetings during 2009, the DOE had told Cobalt as late as November that they didn’t believe in biobutanol as a transport fuel. “It’s great to see, and reflects a growing belief that biobutanol is real, and here now.”

Wilson cautioned that the industry would need to develop more sophisticated hedging strategies for itself in the months and years to come.

Wilson said that, because there was not a futures market for certain advanced feedstocks and fuels that enabled the execution of sophisticated hedging strategies, the industry should tie its pricing to oil so that oil futures could be used as a proxy for hedging against downside risk. “If you peg a fuel contract to the price of oil, say RBOB plus 10 or RBOB minus 10 or whatever your commercial deal needs to be, then you have the tools to begin to develop a hedging strategy using some of the techniques used by major fuel traders such as BP.”

Commenting on the news that the US federal government would developing a program offering up to $40 billion in loan guarantees, Wilson said, “What we really need at this stage are grants. If someone builds a small project and it works, then the market can take it from there. What investors need is to be convinced that the technology risk has gone away.” "
Exploring China’s alternative energy market; As China’s solar and wind power sectors grab headlines, leading agribusiness companies are grabbing a foothold in China’s biofuel sector. As oil prices threaten to rise in years to come, China’s drive to create a biofuel industry that does not include use of foodstocks is gaining fans among foreign investors - RSA - Feb 5, 2010
http://rightsite.asia/en/article/china-biofuel-industry-prov…
ITA chief calls aviation biofuels “a $100 billion+ business opportunity” - BD/TDN - Feb 5 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/05/ita-chief-calls-avia…
www.traveldailynews.com/pages/show_page/35456-Intra-Asia-mar…

"In Singapore, IATA CEO Giovanni Bisignani said that challenges for the Asian aviation industry included working through ICAO to develop sustainable second-generation biofuels. “Five airlines have successfully tested biofuels and we expect certification within 2011 at the latest. Aviation biofuel is a US$100 billion plus business opportunity. And I hope that this region will play a key role in its early development,” Bisignani told attendees at the Singapore Air Show.

He said that the aviation industry aimed to perspire for the next round of climate change talks, with industry sessions at the ICAO Assembly in September-October. "
Singapore, EADS form partnership for algae-based aviation biofuels - BD/TO - Feb 5, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/05/singapore-eads-form-…
www.todayonline.com/Singapore/EDC100205-0000145/Flying-high-…

"In Singapore, the national Agency for Science, Technology and Research’s Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences announced a partnership with aerospace and defense contractor EADS to develop renewable jet fuel from algae. The 12-month project will examine the feasibility of kerosene production from microalgae.

The announcement took place against the backdrop of the SIngapore Air Show, where industry leaders expressed hope of reducing their 2-3 percent share of global carbon emissions.
Carine Huc-Pinault, Airbus’ director of Environment Strategy told Today Online: “We are pushing forward and this year (with) two main projects. The first is implementation of biofuels for aviation and the second is development of modernised air-traffic management.” "
EU may reclassify some oil palms plantations as forest, clearing way for importation of palm oil biodiesel - BD - Feb 5, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/05/eu-may-reclassify-so…
http://news.mongabay.com/2010/0204-palm_oil.html

"In Belgium, the European Union said that it is considering re-classifying oil palm plantations as forest land, and would allow the use of biofuels produced on land converted from rainforest.

A document leaked from Brussels stated: “Continuously forested areas are defined as areas where trees have reached, or can reach, at least heights of 5 meters, making up a crown cover of more than 30%. They would normally include forest, forest plantations and other tree plantations such as palm oil. Short rotation coppice may qualify if it fulfills the height and canopy cover criteria.” Environmental groups were aghast at the development, and reports said that the Malaysian Palm Oil Council and the Indonesian equivalent, the Indonesian Palm Oil Association, have been doing heavy lobbying in the EU. "
Large scale jatropha Vehicle Testing Lab is launched in Manila - BD - Feb 5, 2010
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/05/large-scale-jatropha…

"In Manila, a large scale Vehicle Testing Research Laboratory (VTRL) has been completed to test the technical viability of jatropha methyl esters (JME) as a fuel in buses, trucks and other vehicles. This testing is part of a commercialization plan that will boost the country’s supply of biofuel and raise the blend percentage to five percent, up from the present two percent.:eek: JME has already completed successful pilot testing at the Industrial Technology Development Institute (ITDI). "
Mail Alert:

"Hi again!

What a week that was. Until last week, we had cool technologies that we were proving in separate small systems.

Last Monday, we went wide with the news that we'd just unveiled our complete algae pilot production system, and nothing has been the same since. (see launch video, photos)

The coverage has been fantastic... KABC-TV, Reuters, several industry publications, all of which you can see on our website.

Then, Friday, my favorite public radio station went live with an interview that had all our friends in LA calling us! (click here for interview)

What does this mean? It means that we are going to market. I'm not allowed to say what or when the next milestone will be, but it will be sooner rather than later. You'll like it.

And from the strong trend this week, the market definitely agrees that we are on track!

Thanks for the many, many expressions of support, they are truly appreciated.

Onward!

Riggs and team.


Riggs Eckelberry
President & CEO

http://vimeo.com/9123970
http://picasaweb.google.com/proteanwork/OriginOilPilotPlantU…
http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/los_ang…
www.scpr.org/news/2010/02/05/green-scum-fuel/ "
Cyclone’s multi-fuel compatible external combustion engine on verge of EU patent - BD - Feb 10, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/10/cyclones-multi-fuel-…

"In the EU, Cyclone is reporting that has received notice that a patent will be issued for its external combustion steam engine, one that will run on virtually any liquid or gaseous fuel, and creating far fewer noxious emissions than comparable internal combustion engines. Cyclone’s COO , Frankie Fruge noted that “many nations of the EEU have well developed renewable energy programs for solar thermal, biomass and waste energy recovery – areas where we feel our solution can dominate in the market.” "
Deinove reports that Deinococcus bacteria may be ideal microbe for biofuels fermentation - BD - Jan 10, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/10/deinove-reports-that…
http://deinove.fr/en/

"In France, a microbe R&D company exploring the properties of Deinococcus and other radio-resistant bacteria is reporting that that Deinococcus sp. “naturally” present most of the characteristics of an “ideal microbe” for producing ethanol cost-effectively and is developing novel industrial processes that harness the natural and engineered bio-diversity of Deinococcus and other super-resistant genera.

Deinove’s proprietary processes could provide a powerful alternative (from industrial and environmental perspectives) to yeast, E. coli, Clostridia and many other micro-organisms used in industrial processes. The company numbers Truffle Capital among its early-stage investors.
"
Iogen gets top rating in Lux Research advanced biofuels report - BD - Feb 11, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/11/iogen-gets-top-ratin…
http://earth2tech.com/2010/02/09/the-best-worst-biofuel-star…

"In Canada, Iogen received the highest ranking in a new rating system for early-stage biofuel companies released by analyst firm Lux Research. The Lux report rates companies in five categories: fermentation, gasification, synthetic biology, chemical processes, and algae.

Lux said that the key to a high rating as a company is progress towards “commercial scale…companies that get there first — due to favorable funding, government assistance, or operational excellence — will have the best prospects even if their technology isn’t the absolute best in class.” Other companies scoring well in the Lux analysis are Mascoma, Phycal, Algenol and Solazyme. "
Iogen gets top rating in Lux Research advanced biofuels report - BD - Feb 11, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/11/iogen-gets-top-ratin…
http://earth2tech.com/2010/02/09/the-best-worst-biofuel-star…

"In Canada, Iogen received the highest ranking in a new rating system for early-stage biofuel companies released by analyst firm Lux Research. The Lux report rates companies in five categories: fermentation, gasification, synthetic biology, chemical processes, and algae.

Lux said that the key to a high rating as a company is progress towards “commercial scale…companies that get there first — due to favorable funding, government assistance, or operational excellence — will have the best prospects even if their technology isn’t the absolute best in class.” Other companies scoring well in the Lux analysis are Mascoma, Phycal, Algenol and Solazyme. "
Nebraska researchers embrace algae - BD - Feb 11, 2010

- Jim Lane -
www.biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2010/02/11/nebraska-researchers…
http://bioenergy.checkbiotech.org/news/university_nebraska_l…

"In Nebraska, researchers at the University of Nebraska’s Beadle Center announced that part of the university’s greenhouse complex will be converted to support algae cultivation in bags and a small raceway pond. The university has received $1.9 million in federal funding for its research, and said that its staff expertise in algal virology, algal molecular biology, lipid biochemistry, and plant genetic engineering were critical competitive edge for the university in its algal research efforts. "
:eek:

Novozymes announces $2 per gallon cellulosic ethanol will arrive in 2011; dramatic enzyme breeakthrough - BD - Feb 15, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/15/novozymes-annou…
www.novozymes.com/en

"In Denmark, Novozymes announced that productivity increases with its new Cellic CTec2 enzymes have brought enzyme costs down to 50 cents per gallon, and will enable the biofuel industry to produce cellulosic ethanol at a price below USD 2.00 per gallon for the initial commercial-scale plants that are scheduled to be in operation in 2011. This cost is on par with gasoline and conventional ethanol at the current US market prices.

Marketing Director Poul Anderson confirmed that the company would be using a cocktail of 5-7 enzymes for its customers, and that the optimization process would take from 2-12 months per customer, but could be completed during the overall cellulosic ethanol production plant. Anderson confirmed that the enzymes will be produced at the company’s proposed Nebraska facility.

“The enzymes are ready,” says Novozymes’ CEO, Steen Riisgaard. “Biofuel producers now have a critical component to turn agricultural waste into a competitive alternative to gasoline.”

Extraordinary advances in enzyme development have reduced the enzyme cost for cellulosic ethanol by 80% over the past two years and enzyme costs are now down to approximately 50 cents per gallon of cellulosic ethanol. Novozymes has allocated unprecedented resources to the project, and the company has also received development grants totaling USD 29.3 million from the US Department of Energy. Novozymes has partnered with leading companies in the biofuel industry, such as POET, Greenfield Ethanol, Inbicon, Lignol, ICM, M&G, CTC, COFCO, Sinopec, and PRAJ to help accelerate process technology development and implementation. Coupled with further improvements in enzyme efficiency, Novozymes expects the cost to produce cellulosic biofuel to be further reduced.
"
:eek:

DARPA official says teams at $2 per gallon algal fuel, headed for $1; 50 Mgy scale by 2011 - BD/Guardian - Feb 15, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/15/darpa-official-…
www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/feb/13/algae-solve-penta…

"In Washington, the special assistant for energy at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which has been conducting two algal fuels projects, said that “Darpa has achieved the base goal to date. Oil from algae is projected at $2 per gallon, headed towards $1 per gallon.”

Barbara McQuiston told the Guardian that the General Atomics and SAIC-led projects have been recording harvests at more than 1,000 gallons per acre and predicted that large-scale refining, at the 50 Mgy level, would commence as soon as 2011. DARPA is chasing a US military-based goal of obtaining half its fuel from renewable sources by 2016. In Afghanistan, if you could be able to create jet fuel from indigenous sources and rely on that, you’d not only be able to source energy for the military, but you’d also be able to leave an infrastructure that would be more sustainable,” McQuiston told the Guardian.

Last year, the Digest reported that the fuel cost in forward areas for the US military had reached $413 per gallon:eek: :laugh: , due to the cost of supply convoys. "
Seaweed for Fuel? The Algae Revolution: Bioenergy PROFITS Principle, Flexibility - BD - Feb 15, 2010

- Dr. Rosalie Lober -
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/15/seaweed-for-fue…
Microalgae Shows High-Energy Potential as a U.S. Biofuel; AAAS Speakers to Detail Latest Microalgae Developments on February 19 - NREL - Feb 17, 2010
www.nrel.gov/news/press/2010/813.html

"Dr. Al Darzins, Principal Group Manager at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will discuss how NREL is advancing the development of microalgae as a renewable biofuel on Feb. 19 at the AAAS Annual Meeting in San Diego.

NREL researchers currently are accelerating efforts to identify and characterize the most promising microalgae strains for biofuels production by putting a greater emphasis on understanding the basic biology of microalgae.

While cellulosic biomass feedstocks are the furthest along the biofuels commercialization track, biofuels derived from microalgae are generating considerable interest. Microalgae are small, plant-like photosynthetic microorganisms that are found in many aquatic habitats including fresh, brackish and marine environments. They are able to convert light energy (sunlight) and carbon dioxide into chemical energy by storing it in the bonds of sugars and lipids.

The AAAS Annual Meeting symposium titled “Algae for Food, Feed, Fiber, Freshwater, and Fuel” is designed to address the potential future impact of algae-based technologies on food, water and energy. The session takes place Friday, Feb. 19, from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. in Room 9 at the San Diego Convention Center. A related press briefing will be at 11 a.m., also on Feb. 19.


Other speakers at the AAAS Annual Meeting session “Algae for Food, Feed, Fiber, Freshwater, and Fuel” will be Dan Kammen, University of California; Bob Hebner, University of Texas; Ron Pate, Sandia National Laboratories; Norm Whitton, Sunrise Ridge; and Greg Horowit, Venture Partner Fund.

NREL is DOE’s primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development. NREL is operated for DOE by The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. "
D1 Oils shares jump 10 percent on news of $800K in Indian state funding for jatropha development - BD - Feb 17 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/17/d1-oils-shares-…
www.agrimoney.com/news/d1-shares-jump-10percent-as-tie-up-wi…

"In the UK, shares in D1 Oils jumped more than 10 percent after the company announced that it will receive $800,000 in Indian national government support. The company also recently announced that it is developing jatropha in partnership with an unnamed major European oil &gas company — possibly Total :eek: — and had made headway in its efforts to test non-toxic jatropha meal at the small mammal level. "
BIOFUELS: A report has claimed industrial biofuel production could push 600 million more people into hunger by 2020 due to competition between food and energy crops - NEF - Feb 16, 2010
www.newenergyfocus.com/do/ecco/view_item?listid=1&listcatid=…

( Meals per gallon; The impact of industrial biofuels on people and global hunger - ActionAid - Feb10
www.actionaid.org.uk/doc_lib/meals_per_gallon_final.pdf )

"Industrial biofuel production could push 600 million extra people into hunger by 2020, charity ActionAid has claimed.

The startling figure comes in a report published yesterday (February 15) in which author Tim Rice calls for a moratorium on the further expansion of industrial biofuel production and investment.

Biofuels - fuels made on an industrial scale from agricultural crops - are seen by the Government as making a substantial contribution to the UK's renewables targets. But its own Renewable Advisory Board noted last month that as only 8% of biofuels consumed in the UK originated from the UK, public concerns on sustainability must be met to meet the technology's potential (see this NewEnergyFocus.com story).

Mr Rice wrote that industrial biofuels have a role so long as they are produced sustainably, do not compete with food and genuinely contribute to reducing greenhouse gases.

But in most cases, he claimed that biofuels did not comply with these conditions but were a major cause of a "food and hunger crisis" as rapidly rising demand for crops for fuel has put them into competition with those grown for food - especially in developing countries.

In just five African countries, Mr Rice said 1.1 million hectares had been given over to industrial biofuels - an area the size of Belgium - and all of the biofuel produced on this land was for export.


The local impacts range from the displacement of people, rising local food prices and food scarcity, Mr Rice claimed.

He added that if all global biofuel targets were met, which in the EU's case would mean increasing the volume biofuels from 13 billion litres to about 55 billion litres, food prices could rise by an additional 76% by 2020, equating to 600 million more people going hungry.

"Biofuels are driving a global human tragedy. Local food prices have already risen massively. As biofuel production gains pace, this can only accelerate," Mr Rice said.



Expensive

Furthermore, Mr Rice dismissed industrial biofuels as "a red herring in the fight against climate change."

Changing land-use, often in carbon rich habitats such as tropical rainforests, and using extra fertiliser to grow biofuels were to blame for this, he said.

Mr Rice claimed that many biofuels were the least cost-effective way of saving greenhouse gas emissions compared to other uses of the feedstock and added that the EU biofuel industry received financial incentives amounting to €4.4 billion (£3.8 billion) in 2006.


Moratorium

To stop this trend, Mr Rice said that the EU and member states must cease biofuel investment including an end to targets and financial incentives.

Instead of committing to industrial biofuels in their 2010 national action plans, states should support small-scale sustainable biofuels in the EU and abroad and reduce transport and energy consumption, he said.

"The huge expansion in industrial biofuels use must be stopped. The UK government is now writing its national action plan which will set out its strategy for renewable energy for the next ten years. This plan must not commit the UK to any further increase in industrial biofuels."

He added: "EU governments must recognise the problems inherent in industrial biofuels and act immediately to change their policies on the use of biofuels. If they don't, they open the door to a future for the world's poor where hunger and climate crises continue to grow." "
da hier ja immer mal wieder gefragt wurde, wie denn diese (Algen)Anlagen aussehen sollen -S.5(was natürlich nur 1ner von mehreren Ansätzen ist(theoretisch wollen die mal 1Mrd. Gallonen/Jahr, in der Wüste, schaffen :eek: :eek: )):
www.algenolbiofuels.com/Algenol 101 Sept 2009.pdf


Sagen wir mal so -wenn die Algengeschichte irgendwann mal größerflächig machbar werden sollte, dann kann sie auf jeden Fall "einen erheblichen Teil der Welt´s Probleme" lösen. &das dürfte kein Overstatement sein.
Jatropha revival: SG releases first elite cultivar; 350 gallons per acre at $1.39/gallon, optimized for Guatemala - BD - Feb 22, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/22/jatropha-reviva…
www.sgfuel.com/news.php?fn_mode=fullnews&fn_incl=1&fn_id=41

"In California, SG Biofuels announced the launch of JMax 100, billed as the “world’s first elite jatropha cultivar”, optimized for production in Guatemala with yields, based on trialing of the cultivar on several thousand acres, of 350 gallons per acre and a production cost of $1.39 per gallon for jatropha oil.

With allowance for profit margins and processing costs (either for transesterification into biodiesel, or hydrotreatment into renewable jet fuel), the wholesale cost of fuel made from JMAx 100-based jatropha oil should be at or below parity with diesel or jet fuel produced from $80 oil.

JMax 100 is the first elite cultivar developed through the company’s JMax Jatropha Optimization Platform, and CEO Kirk Haney said that “The yields and profitability of JMax 100 and the JMax platform far exceed what is currently available through existing varieties of Jatropha. The profitability of Jatropha was projected at$400 per acre — more than 300 percent above existing commercial varieties.




JMax 100 and the JMax Jatropha Optimization Platform have been developed over the past three years by the SG Biofuels Genetic Resource Center (GRC) and a science team that includes three members of the National Academy of Sciences. SG Biofuels’ GRC contains over 6,000 unique accessions and an unprecedented array of Jatropha genetic traits including enhanced fruit yield, pest resistance, soil adaptation, improved flowering capabilities, uniformity and improved harvesting. “JMax is built on a base consisting of the SG technical team, the sequencing of the jatropha genome, the data we have from our cross breeding program, and our regional studies,” said Haney. Up to 1.25 million acres in Guatemala offer suitable conditions for jatropha cultivation using the JMax 100 cultivar.

With the announcement, SG moves from development to its commercial phase, and said that it is seeking customer partnerships immediately to develop opportunities for JMax 100’s deployment.The company said that JMax 100 increases increases the profitability of Jatropha to greater than $400 per acre — more than 300 percent above existing commercial varieties, and that SG will seek to partner with departments of Agriculture, oil companies, “strict financial” investors or large landowners on seed selection through contract plantation management services.

SG said that it is collaborating with the Hawaii Agriculture Research Center (HARC) to develop a customized Jatropha cultivar that can be used to meet the high local demand for locally-grown renewable fuel.

Commenting on the cycle of promise and despair that has plagued jatropha development in recent years, Haney said that “the reason jatropha was hyped was that the promise was so high, but the proper work wasn’t done,” lamenting the “high-profile failure” of D1 Oil’s original business models and first round of plantation.

But he added that “JMax 100 is the tip of the iceberg in the development of Jatropha as a renewable energy crop,” said Haney. “While Guatemala now has a significant head-start, we anticipate continued advancements through the JMax platform that will further enhance the productivity and profitability of Jatropha for growers around the world.”


“The Jatropha Revival” was listed as #5 on the list of 10 Biofuels Predictions for 2010 in the Digest on January 1st.

In other news, chemists at UC Davis announced a new process that can convert both plant oils and carbohydrates into biodiesel in one process, converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid esters that can increase yields by up to 24 percent and performs better in cold temperatures. The researchers said that production costs were higher, but would be offset by improved fuel yields. "
Camelina’s prospects in Central Asian republics touted - BD - Feb 22, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/22/camelinas-prosp…
www.istockanalyst.com/article/viewarticle/articleid/3662757

"In China, iStockAnalysts offered an assessment of opportunities for camelia production in the Central Asian republics of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan. “Camelina’s potential could allow Uzbekistan to begin breaking out of its most dolorous legacy, the imposition of a cotton monoculture that has warped the country’s attempts at agrarian reform since achieving independence in 1991,” according to the report.

Kazakhstan is the major wheat exporter in Central Asia, while overproduction of cotton has reduced the Aral Sea to less than one-quarter of its original size.

Camelina experts say that a combination of wheat and camelina could produce consistent and increased income for the region. “At 1,400 pounds per acre at 16 cents a pound, camelina would bring in $224 per acre; 28-bushel white wheat at $8.23 per bushel would garner $230,” according to Dr. Bill Schillinger at Washington State University, as reported in Capital Press. "
Cassava set to surge in China as ethanol feedstock, says report - BD - Feb 22, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/22/cassava-set-to-…
www.renewableenergymagazine.com/paginas/Contenidosecciones.a…

"In China, Renewable Energy magazine profiled growth of the cassava ethanol industry in China, including a report that genetic research has mapped “95% of the genes and will provide data on the use of cassava as an energy source and its ability to survive in infertile and dry soil,” according to Peng Ming, director of the Institute of Biology of the Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences.

The focus of Chinese research has been isolating opportunities to extend cassava production into colder and drier areas. Currently, 60 percent of Chinese cassava is grown in Guanhxi province. "
Low-cost cellulosic ethanol enzyme production technique annoucned by Florida team - BD - Feb 22, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/22/low-cost-cellul…
http://news.ucf.edu/UCFnews/

"In Florida, researchers at the University of Central Florida have announced a new process for production of low-cost enzymes for cellulosic ethanol production in the current issue of the Plant Biotechnology Journal. The research team led by Dr. Henry Daniell, using enzyme cocktails derived from plants, including pectinase and xylase.

The process cloned genes from wood-rotting fungi or bacteria and produced enzymes in tobacco plants. Producing the enzymes in tobacco instead of manufacturing synthetic versions could reduce the cost of production by a thousand times, according to Daniell.

Tobacco was chosen as an ideal system for enzyme production because of several reasons. It is not a food crop, and an estimated 40 metric tons of biomass — or “bioenergy” — are produced annually in each acre of tobacco plants. Enzyme production also would provide an alternate use for this crop and potentially decrease its use for smoking. "
wie zu sehen, sind seeehr unterschiedliche Prognosen vorhanden(was ja auch klar ist, da es noch absolutes Neuland, mit ungewissem Ausgang, ist) -mit 25% Market Share bei den Advanced Biofuels in 2013 könnte ich preeeeetty gut leben. :D ;) (vermutlich aber, weitaus, zu optimistisch) Wobei es natürlich auch einen riesen Unterschied zwischen "den ersten erfolgreichen Unternehmen" &das erreichen einer Wirtschaftlichkeit einer kompletten Branche gibt:

Algal Biofuels: Two years or 10 years away? New views on timelines, models, viability - BD - Feb 24, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/24/algae-new-views…
www.scientificamerican.com/blog/post.cfm?id=co-location-coul…
http://eaba-association.eu/press.php
www.sandia.gov/news/resources/news_releases/fueling-the-futu…

"On the eve of the National Algae Association West Coast meeting in Las Vegas (Thursday and Friday of this week), news from the European Algae Biomass Association as well as presenters at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual conference in San Diego offered news on business models, new research and timelines for algal fuel commercialization.



- 25 percent of advanced biofuels capacity by 2013 (421 Mgy, of a total of $1679 Mgy) is expected to be in the form of commercial-scale algal fuel plants, according to company guidance as consolidated in the Digest's Advanced Biofuels production database -


The co-location imperative

In California, Scientific American is reporting on co-location schemes for access to carbon dioxide or wastewater. “Various scientists speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual conference, which wraps up here today, were promoting the notion that algae operations should be located next to industries that can supply one or more of the nutrient streams,” Scientific American’s blog writers reported. The SciAm item focuses on a presentation by Sunrise Ridge Algae in Texas that is operating a pilot plant in Austin, Texas and using wastewater from the nearby Hornsby Bend plant. The article also profiles the co-location of the Seambiotic pilot plant in Israel with a coal-fired power plant.


Europeans see carbon, commercial viability

In Europe, the European Algae Biomass Association said that the “The EABA Scientific Committee is confident that the commercial production of algae biofuels can be achieved with a positive carbon footprint and will represent a further important step in the direction of reducing CO2 emission in European transport, including aviation.” In a meeting held last Wednesday, the Scientific Committee, which includes experts from major Universities and other scientists in the field of algae biomass, confirmed that a low cost, low carbon production of algae biofuels is an attainable technology objective for industrial development.The association also said that the European consortium AquaFUELs, which started its activities in January 2010, is set to deliver in the forthcoming months a sound scientific assessment of algae based biofuels in terms of both their expected sustainability and increased carbon efficiency.


Two years or 10 years?

In California, Sandia National Laboratory researcher Ron Pate said that “People who are more realistic think this will take at least 10 years for research and investments to get it to the point where [algal fuels] has commercial viability. I think the jury’s still out, but we’ll likely see an impact in the next decade.” Pate, who is a principal member of technical staff at Sandia, has been in Washington, D.C., since November 2009, serving as a technical consultant to the emerging algae biofuels program within the Biomass Office of the Department of Energy’s Office of Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (EERE).

Pate’s presentation, “Resources, Methods, and Approaches for Algae Production,” covered many of the current issues surrounding algae research and development. According to New Mexico-based Sandia, “The U.S. has ample sunlight, lower value land and non-freshwater resources in the lower latitude coastal and inland states, including the Southwest region of New Mexico, Arizona and California, to potentially produce large volumes of biofuel feedstock, if high productivities can be reliably achieved.”



Digest commentary

There’s a material divergence of opinion on the timelines for algal commercialization. Groups are generally in the 10-year camp or the 2-3 year camp. In the ten year camp we find researchers such as Ron Pate, but also companies such as ExxonMobil and Sapphire Energy. Sapphire’s commercialization path aims for 1 billion gallons in the 2020s, while ExxonMobil’s biofuels chief Emil Jacobs has candidly discussed algae in 10-year timelines. Although the National Labs have occasionally been chided for thinking in “elongated timelines,” there are major commercial players thinking in the same time frames.

With the exception of Sapphire, which has laid out a commercialization path leading to a first 100 million gallon facility in 2018, we haven’t seen a published timetable that explains the ten-year horizon; something we might well see from the Algal Biomass Roadmap project in the future.

On the other hand, we have companies such as PetroAlgae, Algenol, Aurora and Solazyme giving guidance of expectations for much shorter commercialization timelines. Algenol’s Biofields project begins construction this year, and Biofields continues to guide the markets to expect commercial capacity by 2013 in the 250 Mgy range. Algenol CEO Paul Woods expressed to the Digest last year that we would regard the achievement of only 300 Mgy in capacity by mid-decade as a “disappointment”.

For some, the lack of recognition, and the skepticism over early commercialization efforts, rankles. Last December, Algenol was ranked #31 out of more than 1400 eligible companies in the “50 Hottest Companies in Bioenergy” by a panel of international selectors and Digest readers — but behind companies such as Solazyme, Sapphire Energy, ExxonMobil and PetroAlgae. After the announcement, Woods wrote “I really have lost faith in you now, and your rankings. Please stick with your top rated companies and leave me and Algenol out of your Digest in all respects.”

PetroAlgae has confirmed that it has a goal of establishing a first 70 Mgy commercial-scale facility by 2012 (although, as a public company, it has expressed this as an aspirational goal, rather than in formal guidance), and has established a string of MOUs in China, India and North Africa towards that end with a South American deal widely expected this year. However – and significantly – its early-stage commercial deals are all utilizing the company’s lemna platform; PetroAlgae has not yet reported an MOU for its algal platform.

Further, Solazyme confirmed at last year’s Advanced Biofuels Development Summit that it would expect to have its first 100 Mgy (or large-scale commercial) facility in operation by 2012-13, and CTO Harrison Dillon confirmed subsequently that the company expects to be competitive with $80 oil in that timeline.

Finally, Aurora Biofuels projected that it would deliver “1.30 algal fuel at the gate” by 2013.

One thing is evident: with the exception of Aurora (which missed out on the recent DOE grants), all of the companies reporting shorter timelines for commercialization have highly differentiated strategies. Algenol has an algae-to-ethanol technology; Solazyme produces oils from heterotrophic algae grown in dark fermenters, using sugar rather than CO2 and sunlight as feedstocks. PetroAlgae, as mentioned above, is using open ponds but its early commercialization deals are focusing on lemna rather than micro-algae.


Alas, no related stories available at this time. "
Shenyu New Energy to increase its jatropha acreage in China by 60 percent; 28 Mgy biodiesel plant envisioned - BD/UPI - Feb 24, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/02/24/shenyu-new-ener…
www.upi.com/Science_News/Resource-Wars/2010/02/23/China-shru…

"In China, Shenyu New Energy announced that it intends to increase its jatropha plantings in Yunnan province from 49,445 acres to 82,410 acres in 2010, through contract growing arrangements with farmers,m focusing on the Yongxing district.

The company is building a $9.5 million jatropha biodiesel plant that will open in Q3 2010 that will initially process 860,000 gallons of jatropha oil per year but will have a capacity of up to 28 Mgy which will be utilized as plantation volumes increase. Yunnan province, overall, has set a provincial goal of produ… "
Es gibt keine wirklichen Alternativen zum Erdöl zur Zeit !.
Update Prism Solar

Prism Solar, PPG partner to test different glass for standard, holographic PV modules

Prism Solar and PPG Industries have joined forces to test the performance of different types of glass in both standard and holographic photovoltaic modules at various incident and direct angles. The companies say that the tests will compare PPG’s Solarphire antireflective high-transmissive glass to patterned glass to ascertain the increase in energy yield.

The holographic solar module developer will be characterizing the performance of PPG’s AR glass and patterned glass to determine the increased energy yield in relation to angular performance.

By measuring energy yield from a series of modules characterized to be equivalent in terms of peak watt rating, the added value of AR properties for monofacial modules as well as Prism's bifacial holographic planar concentrator modules can be determined, according to the partners. Test arrays with tilt angles from 0° to 90° will be explored to provide data on a full range of possible array tilt angles.

Prism's CTO Glen Rosenberg said that the company is particularly intrigued by this project because its "holographic modules are designed to accept high levels of incident light, resulting in 25% more kilowatt-hour per peak watt on average. It will be very interesting to see the additional boost in performance that results from coupling holograms with PPG’s antireflective glass product.”

Prism Solar has holographic film and module production facilities as well as significant R&D capabilities in Highland, NY, and Tucson, AZ, with capacity expansion plans under way.

Website mit Film

Bis zu 75% weniger Silizium
http://www.prismsolar.com/
“Algae Will Be Local”: OriginOil CEO to Speak at Algae World Summit in San Diego; Riggs Eckelberry will speak on decentralization of energy production through algae - Mar 9, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/“algae-will-be-local”-origino…

"Los Angeles, CA March 9, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, has announced that the company’s president and CEO, Riggs Eckelberry, will join a distinguished panel of speakers to kick off the Algae World Summit in San Diego, California, on May 18, 2010.

In keeping with the industry’s push to achieve commercial scale, this year’s Summit will focus on the critical phase “From Lab to Scale Up” and will push for collaboration between the many players in algae at all levels.

In the discussion, Eckelberry will build on his theme “Algae Will Be Local”. His argument is that industrialized algae requires industrial quantities of CO2. Because CO2 is too expensive to transport to a central location, most algae production will tend to occur at CO2 generating sites, leading to a highly decentralized energy model.

Eckelberry foresees the emergence of algae network operators who will provide the expertise to run these far-flung algae sites, and also aggregate the products for downstream processing. He points out that this model is a complete shift from centralized energy and will lead to the involvement of many types of businesses in energy generation.

OriginOil played a supporting role in launching this conference series, which uniquely focuses on the “value chain” of algae from supplier to end user. At last year’s inaugural summit, Riggs Eckelberry joined a distinguished panel of executives, including the National Biodiesel Board and Marathon Oil, to first discuss the emergence of a new algae industry.

“OriginOil has taken the lead in advocating a strong community that knits together researchers, manufacturers, providers and customers in a worldwide network,” said Eckelberry. “This year’s Algae World Summit directly supports this vision and that is why we have been such strong supporters of the event. We look forward to the opportunity to build a central role for algae in helping to reduce the world’s dependence on petroleum.”

In October 2009, OriginOil announced that its algae oil extraction system had reached the highest industry efficiency standards while requiring very low energy inputs. Since then, OriginOil has itself turned toward commercialization and recently announced its new end to end algae production system.

Unlike scientific research-oriented events, the goal of the Algae World Summit is to provide a forum where the algae community can discuss and learn how to build the links within the value chain that are necessary to make the algae industry a reality.

This year’s guest list includes representatives from The United States Department of Agriculture, SAIC, ExxonMobil and the U.S. Department of Energy, among many others.


The Algae World Summit will take place from May 17-20 at the Hilton Del Mar in San Diego, CA. For more information or to attend the conference, visit www.infocastinc.com/algae10 .


About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.105.959 von Popeye82 am 10.03.10 16:58:29
Gästeliste übrigens -da sollte wahrs. noch der ein- oder andere Player darunter sein, der sich daran versucht(meisten abseits der Organisationen):

"+ Advisory One, LLC
+ Aerojet
+ Airbus Americas
+ Aquafauna Biomarine
+ Arizona State University
+ Biodiesel Industries, Inc.
+ BioFuel Energy Corp.
+ BP Alternative Energy
+ Braemer Energy Ventures
+ Burdock Group Consultants
+ Chadbourne
+ City of Sunnyvale Wastewater
+ Treatment Plant
+ CMEA Capital
+ Cornhusker
+ CP KELCO
+ Earthrise Nutritionals
+ Exxon Mobil Chemical
+ Florida Power & Light
+ FMC Biopolymer
+ Gemtek
+ General Atomics
+ General Motors
+ Gilbert Arizona Treatment
+ Glyos Biotechnologies
+ Hamilton Clark & Co.
+ HR BioPetroleum, Inc.
+ Imperium Renewables
+ IR1 Group
+ Kai Bioenergy
+ Kent BioEnergy Corporation
+ KLM Royal Dutch Airlines
+ LiveFuels Inc
+ Marathon Oil Corp.
+ Mars Symbioscience
+ Martek Biosciences, Boulder, CO
+ Napa Valley Wastwater Plant
+ Noventi Ventures
+ NREL
+ OriginOil, Inc
+ Praxair, Inc
+ Renewable Energy Group, Inc
+ Ron Henson Consulting Services
+ Ronore Enterprises, Inc
+ Royal Dutch Shell
+ SAIC
+ Scotia Capital
+ Solazyme
+ Solix Biofuels Inc.
+ Unilever
+ US Department of Agriculture
+ University of Arizona
+ University of South Maine
+ University of Minnesota
+ US Department of Energy
+ XL Renewables

www.infocastinc.com/index.php/conference/algae10 "
Spring Algae Bloom: an inside look at the DOE’s new algal fuels consortium, the NAABB - BD - Mar 4, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/04/spring-algae-bl…
www.naabb.org

"It was a cold Wednesday afternoon in January when the news came through that a consortium called the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts had received a $44 million grant from the Department of Energy. Another group called the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium had won the other. In all, DOE said it would invest $80 million in a consortia approach to solving technical challenges such as outlined in the Algal Biomass Roadmap process, commenced in late 2008.

2009-10 had been a cold winter; for many the winter would turn colder still, until it seemed as if Washington DC would be buried in snow as deep as the paperwork. But the news of the grants took some of the chill and gloom out of a winter’s day otherwise livened by the opening of the Cobalt pilot in California and news that PetroAlgae had signed a master license for Egypt and Morocco.


Here is the announcement as it arrived over the newswires:


Led by the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center (St. Louis, MO), NAABB will develop a systems approach for sustainable commercialization of algal biofuel (such as renewable gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and bioproducts. NAABB will integrate resources from companies, universities, and national laboratories to overcome the critical barriers of cost, resource use and efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial viability. It will develop and demonstrate the science and technology necessary to significantly increase production of algal biomass and lipids, efficiently harvest and extract algae and algal products, and establish valuable certified co-products that scale with renewable fuel production. Co-products include animal feed, industrial feedstocks, and additional energy generation. Multiple test sites will cover diverse environmental regions to facilitate broad deployment.

Partners are: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Arizona, Brooklyn College, Colorado State University, New Mexico State University, Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University System, University of California Los Angeles, University of California San Diego, University of Washington, Washington University in St. Louis, Washington State University, AXI, Catilin, Diversified Energy, Eldorado Biofuels, Genifuel, HR BioPetroleum, Inventure, Kai BioEnergy, Palmer Labs, Solix Biofuels, Targeted Growth, Terrabon, UOP.



The huge number of partners and the scope of the work seeming daunting — who would get such a large group to work together effectively, and on a three-year timeline instead of the more elongated timelines sometimes associated with the national labs and academia. Algal research pioneer Dr. Richard Sayre at the the Donald Danforth Center in St. Louis, who is leading science for the project, quickly identified Dr. Jose Olivares at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, as the principal investigator and driving force behind the consortium.

Los Alamos hasn’t been as much in the headlines on algal development as, say, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory — but a partnership with algal pioneer Solix Biofuels had been announced only the previous day, in which Solix said that it would incorporate LANL sound-wave technology to optimize algal growth.

According to a report last September in Earth2Tech at the time of the initial R&D agreement between LANL and Solix, “Los Alamos’ acoustic-focusing technology generates ultrasonic fields that concentrate algal cells into a dense sludge and extract oil.
Solix hopes that combining the concentration and extraction steps into one process will eliminate the need for centrifuges and solvents (traditional extraction methods) — and at the same time, significantly cut the cost of producing the biofuel.”

When the news was announced by DOE — it came via a press release and little fanfare or advance preparation. In fact, DOE is famously tight-lipped about grants — and applicants are generally reluctant to share details publicly for fear of upsetting the grant review process.

Like a lot of people, the Digest is highly curious about how exactly the consortia came together, what it aims to achieve, how the DOE process worked, and what innovations we might expect from the team over the next few years. We spoke this week with Dr. Olivares at LANL to learn more about the mysterious workings of the DOE grant process, and the goals and timelines for the consortium.


Digest: How did the consortium come together. What was the basic approach?

JO:
“It’s the first time I’ve put a consortium of this size together. You learn as you go. We had several principles. One, inclusiveness, to make sure you had a broad perspective, from the national labs, academia and industry. Two, understanding the algae value chain as best as we could, and making sure we had good organizations in each area. The third, I think may be the one that made us click, was being transparent and being supportive. Not coming in with “mine is better than yours” but how could we build this together. When it came to the hard decisions, it made it possible to have an attitude that the “best outcome” was important. That helped.


Digest: How did the process work?

JO:
Our approach was very regional at first, how do we bring the southwestern united states to a primary focal point. We have great universities, three national labs and a number of algae companies in this region. As we developed the vision and looked at the entire value chain, what we ended up with was a truly national organization.

We built the consortium in a very academic way. We searched out institutions with biofuel capabilities, asked them to submit proposals with projects and budgets. When we added it all up, we had $120 million, and we had to bring it down to $50 million. A lot of folks were left out – that part of the process can consume a loose organization if not done with transparency.

In one of two instances we had to take an institution out completely, when they were not a team player and were undermining the health of the team. Some groups wanted to hoard everything and it undermined the discussions. It was negative and had to be taken out quickly.


Digest: How did the decisions about ‘paring down’ take place? What were some of the projects eliminated, and why?

JO:
Many of the academic institutions had very strong algal biology programs, we had a three to one capacity in algal biology in terms of what we had compared to what we ultimately needed. For example, we had several nice proposals to develop capabilities for protein engineering in algae — we had a lot of interest in that here at Los Alamos National Lab. But we saw that these technologies were too far away in terms of commercial potential to make a huge impact in the near future, and our goal was not incremental innovation over the next three years.


Digest: How did you select the industry partners?

JO:
In terms of academia, we were very strong upstream with algal biology and cultivation, not as strong in downstream, especially in areas such as development of conversion to biofuels. That’s where our industry partners and PNNL were generally focused. It’s the old story – R&D often comes with a big R and a little D :laugh: for academia, and the other way around for industry, with the national labs somewhere in between. Maybe that’s the way it has to happen.


Digest: How did you interface with the DOE during the period of development, and the application?

JO:
From a policy perspective we had been aware of what was coming down from our participation with DOE in the Algal Biomass Roadmap Workshop in December 2008. That greatly helped develop our vision – at least myself and some others – and it educated me on the complexity of the industry. There were quite a few hurdles. For us, our approach was hands off to the DOE – we see each other at conferences, and I went to the DOE for their conference in May or June, but after the proposal call came out, we had very little communication with DOE. We were trying not to market ourselves but position ourselves as players in the national pipeline. Our goal was keeping the consortium on track — and occasionally I would hear of other consortia who were falling apart over minor issues. For their part, DOE stayed out of the picture and it let us do what we needed to do.


Digest: The grant was for $44 million over three years, and there was a strong cost sharing element. Tell us about that.

JO:
In all, we have $19 million in cost shares. This includes $7.6 million from academia and $11.6 million from industry. Overall we brought 31 percent, well over the 20 percent minimum.


Digest: Tell us about your timelines for getting to work.

JO:
We originally applied for a $49 million grant and the Secretary awarded $44 million, so we are negotiating right now with the DOE and looking at our plan. April 15th is our official kick off meeting, but the authorization to start work should be around April 1st. Some institutions are held up a bit more because they have environmental reviews to complete as well as in some cases some budgetary issues. Also one or two institutions have components that need to be locked down – such as a test bed – that we don’t yet have. One of the major parts is developing a co-product for animal feed – that’s held up a little because for DOE-EERE this is the first time they have experienced a NEPA review on animal testing and they are not as familiar with that. We’re helping them with that process.


Digest: What are your targets?

JO:
We have very ambitious targets, which can be viewed here. We didn’t promise DOE that all of these would be met within the three-year time frame. But our attitude was, if we’re going to make the industry viable we have to have these targets. That impressed DOE, I think.


Digest: Take us through your deliverables.

JO:
In algal biology, our goals include developing new strains with qualities such as resistance to predators, and very high yields in biomass and lipid production. In cultivation area, we are studying the process of scale up, with four test beds with different levels of capacity. In harvesting and oil extract, we are starting with five technologies and hop to focus down to one or two for harvesting the algae in a very energy efficient manner, and that are very cost effective.In conversion, there are six different technologies we’ve chosen to take on and we are investigating biodiesel, gasoline and jet fuel. In co-products, we are very interested in developing a high value, high nutrient animal feed.


Digest: Other goals?

JO:
Sustainability and understanding the use of CO2 and other nutrients. In sustainability, we are especially focused on the utilization of resources, for example land and water resources and using residue waters such as water waste from oil fields. The second is CO2. Plus, we are carefully examining the economic inputs and outputs; especially the energy costs, such as location and transportation inputs and outputs, moving water and transporting fuel.


Digest: There are four test sites you mentioned. Where are they?

JO:
The Texas A&M AgriLife in Pecos TX – they are part of the General Atomics DARPA project also so they are well advanced in developing a site. Solix, the Durango, Colorado site. A new site that the University of Arizona is putting together near a coal-fired power plant in the Tucson area. Also, Sequim Labs – the sea bed lab of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Plus, HR Biopetroleum is setting up a major site in Hawaii that we may be able to utilize in terms of how our work integrates with an actual large scale facility.


Digest: Who will own the intellectual property that comes from the consortium’s work?

JO:
The consortium is not a legal entity – all of the technologies will be owned by the partner that invents them. We have an IP management agreement that says if you develop it, you own it, but grants a non-commercial license for each partner to exercise these technologies to do our work. In terms of commercial use, each member has a first look right at technologies, of 30-60 days, to determine whether to license from the organization that owns it. After that, the owner can shop the technologies elsewhere if they like. It’s a nice agreement, everyone has signed it — its a major contribution in how we play together. "
Latest in algal drying, extraction technologies reviewed at NAA meeting - BD - Mar 4, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/04/latest-in-algal…
www.ascension-publishing.com/BIZ/virtuoso.pdf

"In Nevada, algae drying and oil extraction opportunities were the subject of a presentation at the National ALgae Association meeting in Las Vegas, from Virtuoso Biofuels. The presentation looks at the latest technologies for indirect heat, fluid bed, dirt heat and microwaving for algae drying, while also looking at the latest oil extraction options including expellers and presses, solvent extraction and supercritical extraction. The presentation — downloadable free here, includes pros and cons summary of the various options. "
“Review of the potential for biofuels in aviation” published in UK - BD - Mar 4, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/04/review-of-the-p…
http://hmccc.s3.amazonaws.com/Aviation%20Report%2009/E4tech%…

"In the UK, E4Tech, authors of work on ILUC that was, according to the group, “rather prematurely reported by the Times this week, and picked up by the ETA,” have authored a Review of the potential for biofuels in aviation” as an input to CCC’s report on how UK aviation emissions can be constrained to 2050.

The report finds that “biofuels could supply between 35 and 100% of global jet fuel demand in 2050, provided that the risk of land use change from the production of feedstocks is managed effectively.”

Other findings: Strong interest in alternatives to conventional jet fuel; several routes to biofuels for aviation are likely to be commercialised including hydrotreated oils, and biomass-to-liquids (BTL); and sustainability is a key issue. The report found that algae and waste biomnass are among the most attractive feedstocks, and that projected costs that can be competitive with jet fuel, particularly if the cost of carbon emissions are considered, but only with low feedstock costs.
"
AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com launches - BD - Mar 4, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/04/algae-industry-…
www.algaeindustrymagazine.com

"In Nevada, AlgaeIndustryMagazine.com, the first trade magazine dedicated exclusively to the algae biofuels and co-products production industry, launched at the National Algae Association conference in Las Vegas. Produced by veteran trade magazine publishers David Schwartz, Bill Laski and Linda Gough, the online magazine covers a wide variety of algae production topics including influential personalities, developing technologies, evolving businesses, breakthrough products and important news and events from around the world. "
Today in Biofuels Opinion: “Do you bet on ethanol and biodiesel at this point? Yes, you do.” - BD - Mar 4, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/04/today-in-biofue…
http://bio.org/letters/

"Stu Ellis, University of Illinois: “Do you bet on ethanol and biodiesel at this point? Yes, you do, say USDA’s economists, who assembled a long term projection for corn and soybean oil use in biofuels…Kansas State University ag economist Dan O’Brien analyzed the USDA projects in his report on the Outlook Forum in mid-February…The USDA economists make several assumptions as the basis for their projections…Crude oil prices are expected to increase as economies recover, and reach $100 per barrel by 2019…Ethanol will account for 34-35% of corn use, with corn being the primary feedstock for ethanol production. Biodiesel production will increase to 1 billion gallons by 2012.


Brent Erickson, EVP at BIO’s Industrial and Environmental Section: “Algae-based biofuel technology is advancing rapidly and is ready for commercialization…Unfortunately, though, algae-based biofuel developers do not qualify for existing tax incentives for advanced biofuel development. It is extremely challenging for algae-based biofuel start-up companies to attract the capital required for facility construction, due to this disparate treatment under the tax code. Fixing this discrepancy and granting algae-based biofuels tax treatment similar to other advanced biofuels can open the way to greater job creation and economic growth.”

The Algal Biomass Organization urged Congress and Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-MT) and Ranking Member Charles Grassley (R-IA) to adopt an amendment offered by Senators Bill Nelson (D-FL), Mike Crapo (R-ID) and Jeff Bingaman (D-NM) to the “Tax Extenders Act of 2009” (H.R. 2413). The amendment would ensure algae-based fuels receive the financial and regulatory benefits currently afforded to other advanced biofuel feedstocks and promote the development and commercialization of algae-based fuels. The adoption of this amendment will be a significant step in creating new jobs, increasing energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“This amendment would address one of biggest barriers to the further commercialization of algae-based biofuels – financial parity with other feedstocks,” said Mary Rosenthal, Executive Director of the ABO. “Today, producers are handicapped by a tax code that doesn’t give algae-based fuels the same tax incentives that other advanced biofuels receive, and thus handicaps the algae-based fuel industry as a whole. Providing the tax incentives currently accorded to other advanced biofuels will level the playing field for algae, and help ensure that federal policy supports the development of one of the most promising domestic, renewable, low-carbon, next-generation fuels.”

Current federal tax policy discourages the production of algae-based fuels by failing to provide the same incentives accorded to other advanced biofuels feedstocks, which has made it more difficult for algae producers to attract the capital that is required to construct commercial-scale production facilities. Specifically, algae producers’ inability to access the $1.01 per gallon production tax credit currently afforded to other advanced biofuels has slowed the algae industry’s development.

“The recent ruling by the Environmental Protection Agency that algae-based fuels provide at least 50% emissions reductions compared to petroleum based fuels supports what we’ve been saying all along: algae-based fuels are one of the most environmentally sustainable biofuels in the United States,” said Rosenthal. “Algae’s environmental benefits, coupled with its enormous potential to stimulate our green economy, are just a few of the many reasons Congress should ensure that the tax code provides incentives to advance the development of an entire industry focused on creating renewable, sustainable and domestically-produced fuels that reduce emissions, enhance American energy security and, when fully commercialized, create tens of thousands of American jobs.”

Along with recognizing the leadership of Senators Nelson, Crapo and Bingaman, ABO praised Senators Tom Udall (D-NM) and Sam Brownback (R-KS) for their support of the amendment and the burgeoning algae industry.
"
also die bisher interessanteste Meldung, die ich von OOIL gelesen hab´ :

OriginOil CEO Addresses Algae Fuels Conference at World Biofuels Markets; Riggs Eckelberry reports on harvesting challenge and timeline for commercialization - Mar 17, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/originoil-ceo-addresses-algae…
www.originoil.com/pdf/OOIL_World_Biofuels_Markets_100316.pdf

"Los Angeles, CA March 17, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, announced that the company’s Chief Executive Officer, Riggs Eckelberry, addressed the World Biofuels Markets Congress in Amsterdam on March 16, 2010 on the urgent harvesting challenge and the company's own timeline for commercializing its technology.

Mr. Eckelberry joined fellow CEO Marc Van Aken of SBAE Industries in the last panel of the special Algae Fuels Conference. The two CEOs discussed “Harvesting, Dewatering and Extraction” – a major barrier to algae’s commercialization due to high energy and capital costs. An audience discussion followed ranging widely across algae industry issues.

CEO Eckelberry also gave an update on the company’s progress to market. He discussed the already-launched pilot scale lab system on 28 January 2010 (release), and estimated that by midyear, the company will launch a mobile algae extraction system dubbed ALGAEMAX™, which it will demonstrate to interested algae companies for potential commercial pilot projects in the second half of the year. He added that the company was in ongoing discussions with OEMs.

“It’s clear that algae will be produced everywhere and not just in large central plants,” commented CEO Eckelberry. “That means harvesting systems must be portable, inexpensive and energy-efficient. We need dramatic improvement in this most-vital area of large-scale algae-to-oil production.”

In his presentation, Eckelberry reviewed current industry approaches to extraction and harvesting in depth. These approaches typically require high capital investment, heavy energy usage, and can include toxic chemicals.

He then discussed the radically-different OriginOil approach. OriginOil’s Single-Step Extraction™, known as “wet extraction”, separates the oil and biomass without first dewatering. This dramatically reduces the energy needed.


For the first time, Eckelberry published details of the company’s extraction energy calculations: nearly one-tenth the energy cost of conventional methods, with a proportional reduction in investment expense.

“Current approaches to algae extraction do a great job of precision extraction, but at an energy and capital cost that is unacceptable today even for specialty materials,” said Eckelberry. “Our process has shown an equally high level of extraction capability, with the energy and capital requirements that algae needs to fulfill its potential.”


On 26 October 2009, OriginOil announced that its algae oil extraction system had reached the highest industry efficiency standards, while requiring very low energy inputs.

The Algae Fuels Conference headlined Europe’s largest biofuels event, featuring presentations by Shell’s joint venture Cellana, Dow Chemical, Algenol, SBAE Industries, Sapphire Energy, Wageningen University & Research, The Carbon Trust, University of Sevilla-CSIC, A2BE, Aurora Biofuels, the DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, KIT Institute of Life Science Engineering, and was chaired by the Algal Biomass Organization (ABO) and the European Algae Biomass Association (EABA).


The World Biofuels Markets 2010 Congress took place from March 15-17 at the RAI Congress Centre in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. For more information, visit www.worldbiofuelsmarkets.com. The detailed event brochure can be downloaded here.


About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
EADS CTO says generating 15 percent of aviation fuel from algae by 2030 is Airbus goal - BD/AW - Mar 22, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/22/eads-cto-says-g…
www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story_generic.jsp?channel=av…

"In France, EADS (Airbus’ parent company) Chief Technical Officer Jean Botti called for more R&D on algae-based biofuels, setting a goal of converting 15 percent of all aviation fuel to algal-based biofuels by 2030. He said that on;y algae-based biofuels can be produced in sufficient quantities for replacing fossil fuels without spurring a ruinous competition with food and other uses for land and water for energy crop production.

“I do not see today a real Plan B to replace kerosene,” Botti told AviationWeek. “We absolutely need to push third-generation biofuels made from algae. The first studies show it to be a very compatible fuel, requiring minimum changes to the engine.” Botti said that EADS is investing in algal-based research , saying “we have to push the industry to align with the aircraft of the future. Third-generation biofuels are the Plan B to kerosene.”
"
1 billion gallons of camelina biofuels, $5.5 billion in new revenue, 25,000 jobs by 2025: new report - BD - Mar 23, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/23/1-billion-gallo…
http://biomassadvisors.com/blog/thinking/reports/

"camelinaBiomass Advisors, the research division of Biofuels Digest, projected that one billion gallons of Camelina biofuel would be produced for the aviation and biodiesel sectors by 2025, creating 25,000 new jobs; producing over $5.5 billion in new revenues and $3.5 billion in new agricultural income for U.S. and Canadian farmers.

The projections are contained in “Camelina Aviation Biofuels Market Opportunity and Renewable Energy Strategy Report,” released today by the research group.

The report follows recent announcements by Sustainable Oils and Alt-Air among others, to provide 100 million gallons of Camelina-based jet fuel to a consortium of 15 airlines starting in 2014. Camelina Aviation Biofuels provides an objective, in-depth assessment of Camelina and the market drivers behind aviation industry activity.


“Camelina Aviation Biofuels Market Opportunity and Renewable Energy Strategy Report,” is 116 pages, and includes more than 60 figures, tables and charts, along with regional crop forecast maps for visualizing business opportunities and planning infrastructure needs.

The report is available for a purchase price of $695. "
OriginOil Announces Initiative to Make Jet Fuel from Waste Using Algae; Industry working group will focus on meeting aviation industry demand for algae-based fuel - Mar 24, 2010
www.originoil.com/company-news/originoil-announces-initiativ…
www.electricore.com

"Los Angeles, CA March 24, 2010 – OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, today announced the formation of an industry working group to develop jet fuel from algae using waste streams. The group will start by developing integrated process models to identify the critical technologies needed.

The working group is co-sponsored by OriginOil and the non-profit consortium Electricore.

The first industry partners are biodigester builder Biogas Energy and ionic technology developer Ceramatec. More partner announcements are expected in the weeks to come.

The initiative is a result of OriginOil’s ongoing effort to develop cost-effective algae production. The company previously reported on the promise of using waste streams as a feedstock for algae cultivation.

“The aviation industry has been an early adopter of algae-based jet fuel, and KLM has announced it will fly commercial biofuels flights in 2011,” said Riggs Eckelberry, OriginOil CEO. “Wastewater is a winner for algae and will lead to the scale that we need to service this massive opportunity.”

The first partners will provide some of the key technologies needed, such as anaerobic digestion and fuel cells. OriginOil’s own Helix Bioreactor™ and Single Step Extraction™ systems provide a daily harvest of algae oil and biomass, which can be tailored to meet the ASTM standards for jet fuel.

Biogas Energy Founder and President, Brian Gannon, stated: “We are excited about the potential of working with OriginOil and the other group members to create a turnkey system to convert waste products into energy. We are particularly interested in the utilization of CO2 for algae production, because it reduces the environmental impacts of anaerobic digestion.”


Ceramatec President and CEO, Ashok Joshi, commented: “We look forward to investigating the possibilities of using algae oil and biomass as a feedstock for jet fuel reformulation. We are encouraged by the collaborative nature of the working group and hope to contribute to the success of our partners.”


About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil producing feedstock such as corn and sugarcane often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil™, please visit our website at www.OriginOil.com. "
Sweating the small-stuff: New excretion methods to coax oil, electricity from algae, cyanobacteria - BD - Mar 31, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/31/sweating-the-sm…
www.physorg.com/news189084268.html
www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-03/researchers-steal-raw…

"As regular readers of the Digest — not to mention algal fuel developers — can attest, its hard enough to grow algae in a cost-effective, scalable, sustainable method. But then you have the problem of harvesting microcrops at a concentration of 1 percent within water — a process akin to profitably harvesting corn if you had to do it while a field was lying under a couple of feet of rainfall and you had to harvest millions of stalks to make up a single bushel.




Two of the most interesting projects to come along in a while are reporting results. In one project with shorter term implications, researchers at Arizona State University developed a method to genetically optimize cyanobacteria to “sweat”, or excrete, oils to permit oil harvest without killing the cells. In another, longer-range project, research team in South Korea and California developed a technique by which a strain of microalgae would sweat a tiny electric current when exposed to sunlight.

In Arizona, Roy Curtiss, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology and professor in the School of Life Sciences, told PhysOrg, “By releasing (cyanobacteria’s) precious cargo outside the cell, we have optimized bacterial metabolic engineering to develop a truly green route to biofuel production.” Curtiss and Xinyao Liu had previously programmed cyanobacteria to self-destruct after producing oils, but have now pioneered a method to use the thioesterase enzyme to separate lipids from their complex protein carriers, added genes to stimulate overproduction of lipids, and deleted the S and peptidoglycan layers of the cellular envelope to allow fatty acids to easily pass through the cells walls through diffusion. Voila, continuous production of oils and a three-fold increase in lipid production rates.
More on the ASU project here.

In California, researchers applied an overvoltage to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as it was exposed to a photon supply from sunlight, and demonstrated that the microalgae strain does, under these conditions, produce a tiny electric current which can be captured from the microalgae colony. At the present time, current yield is extremely low, and not feasible for electricity production — but it opens up the possibility that the biological processes of algae could provide a renewable source of direct electric production :eek: in addition to the conversion of fats, carbohydrates and proteins to energy. More on the California/Korean project here. "
General Motors, DOE to fund jatropha projects in India, aiming for new varietals suitable for US - BD - Mar 31, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/31/general-motors-…
http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/news.html/

"In India, General Motors announced a five-year partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy demonstrate that jatropha can produce significant quantities of oil for conversion to biodiesel and to develop new varieties of the plant that have high yields, can withstand frost, and grow in temperate climates such as the United States.

Under the agreement, GM will establish two jatropha farms: a 16-hectare (39.5 acre) plot in Bhavngar and a 38 hectare (93.9 acre) plot in Kalol, near GM’s India Car Manufacturing plant. An existing 30 hectare (74.1 acre) jatropha farm in Bhavnagar also will be managed under this project. Lab-optimized strains of jatropha, produced through selective and marker-assisted breeding, will be cultivated at these farms. The Central Salt & Marine Chemicals Research Institute will manage all of the 84 hectares (840,000 m2). A complete lifecycle analysis will be conducted to evaluate the environmental impacts. "
Indian Oil, Ruchi Soya invest $28 million into 125,000 acre jatropha partnership - BD - Mar 31, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/31/indian-oil-ruch…
www.equitybulls.com/admin/news2006/news_det.asp?id=70361

"In India, Ruchi Soya Industries and Indian Oil Corporation announced a partnership to fund a $97 million project, partly funded by the Uttar Pradesh state government, that will establish 125,000 acres (50,000 hectares) of jatropha plantations in Jhansi and Lalitpur, and a 31.5 Mgy (119 million liter) biodiesel plant. The new company will be known as Indian Oil Ruchi Biofuels, and will be funded 50/50 by the partners with $28.1 million. "
Rochester Institute of Technology reports E20 has no impact on conventional vehicle “drivability or durability” - BD - Mar 31, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/03/31/rochester-insti…
www.growthenergy.org/2009/index.asp

"In Washington, Rochester Institute of Technology released a study shows that E20 has no measurable impact on vehicle drivability or durability, and lower tailpipe emissions compared to conventional gasoline. The study was conducted by RIT’s Center of Integrated Manufacturing Studies. Using a 10-vehicle fleet owned and operated by Monroe County, N.Y., researchers fueled the vehicles – all with older gasoline engines not specifically designed to burn ethanol blends – over the accumulation of at least 100,000 miles per vehicle.

Researchers found that the fleet showed an average reduction of 23 percent for carbon monoxide and a 13 percent reduction for hydrocarbon emissions, with no measurable stress on vehicle operation or mechanics. Tom Buis, CEO of Growth Energy, said the RIT study “confirms what we’ve been saying all along.”
"
Obama’s energy policy shift: more oil drilling; first biofuels supersonic test flight set for Earth Day :eek: - BD, WASHINGTON - Apr 1, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/01/obamas-energy-p…
Honeywell’s UOP, Indian Oil sign MOU for advanced biofuels demonstration: pyrolysis, hydroprocessing in focus - BD - Apr 1, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/01/honeywells-uop-…
www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9EPOBU00.htm

"In Illinois, UOP, a Honeywell (NYSE: HON) company, announced a memorandum of understanding with Indian Oil Corp (IOCL) to evaluate installation of a demonstration-scale unit to produce advanced biofuels, and to evaluate the viability of pyrolysis oil technology to convert lignocellulosic materials, or plant biomass, into renewable power and heat. IOCL would also focus on research and development for the production of algal oil for use as a feedstock in the green fuels production.

The UOP/Eni Ecofining process uses catalytic hydroprocessing technology to convert natural oils and animal fats to Honeywell Green Diesel fuel. The product, which is chemically indistinguishable from traditional diesel fuel, offers improved performance including a higher cetane value, excellent cold-flow performance and reduced emissions over both biodiesel and petroleum-based diesel.

Honeywell’s UOP has also developed process technology to produce Honeywell Green Jet fuel under a contract from DARPA for both military and commercial aircraft. In 2008, Honeywell’s UOP formed Envergent Technologies with Ensyn Corp. to offer rapid thermal processing technology that converts biomass such as forest waste or agricultural residuals into pyrolysis oil. "
DOE, Lawrence Berkeley to build $18 million Advanced Biofuels Lab – integration, process testing for public use - BD - Apr 1, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/01/doe-lawrence-be…
www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/

"In Washington, the DOE announced that the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will build an advanced biofuels process lab aimed at speeding the commercialization of advanced biofuels by allowing researchers and the private sector to test and integrate innovative technologies. The facility – funded with nearly $18 million from the Recovery Act – will be a publicly available facility where researchers can integrate process steps and test innovative technology pathways, such as those being developed at DOE’s Office of Science Bioenergy Research Centers. This facility will be the only one of its kind available for public use.

“The Department is committed to developing cost-effective and sustainable advanced biofuels. With this investment, we will vastly increase the capacity to test new innovative approaches on a larger, integrated scale,” said Assistant Secretary Cathy Zoi. “Scaling up these clean energy technologies is crucial to addressing climate change and building a strong, domestic clean energy economy.”

This facility is part of the Obama Administration’s continued commitment to building a robust and sustainable transportation system based on clean energy and domestic innovation. The Advanced Biofuels Process Development Unit (PDU) will leverage the efforts of the Department’s National Laboratories and the private sector to help move new technologies into the marketplace. The PDU will provide universities, national laboratories, and industry partners the opportunity to scale up promising processes discovered in their laboratories. Planned capabilities include unique pretreatment of biomass, enzyme production, fermentation for the production of multiple biofuels, and product purification in quantities sufficient for engine testing at partner institutions.

The PDU is scheduled to be fully operational by early 2011, and multiple possible sites for the facility are now being considered in the San Francisco East Bay region.

The Department’s Biomass Program has awarded nearly $718 million in Recovery Act funds to accelerate the commercialization of advanced biofuels and foster the growth of a sustainable U.S. bioindustry. These investments will facilitate the bioindustry’s ability to meet mandated production requirements for advanced biofuels, which increase from 950 million gallons per year in 2010 to 21 billion gallons per year in 2022. :eek: Advanced biofuels are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 50 percent and can be produced from diverse non-food biomass such as forestry and agricultural residues, mill wastes, energy crops, and sorted municipal solid waste. "
From the National Algae Association: "National Algae Association's efforts to move the algae industry - BD - Apr 2, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/02/today-in-biofue…

"From the National Algae Association: “National Algae Association’s efforts to move the algae industry out of the laboratories and into the commercial-scale production are paying off. Construction has been completed on a commercial-scale photobioreactor demo located at Lone Star College in The Woodlands, Texas…NAA has also established an Engineering Consortium to identify and resolve issues that will arise as various production systems are scaled up. Services, designs are under way for a 100-acre commercial-scale algae production facility. As a result of the “100 Acre Challenge” issued by Barry Cohen, Executive Director of the National Algae Association to NAA members, the consortium has been working very quickly and diligently to make commercial-scale algae production a reality.” ..."
"Dear Colleague,

This is a very exciting time at OriginOil.

We’ve been busy building ALGAE MAX – that’s our Mobile EXtraction unit. (MAX is a fully-equipped trailer-based laboratory that will travel to US-based algae producers to demonstrate our extraction capability.)

These demonstrations are intended to get commitments for commercial pilot programs. I’ll keep you fully updated on this.

Then, our waste-to-jet fuel working group is attracting more members and will help us establish a key strategic role for algae. This is an intensely important subject to players such as the Departments of Energy and Defense, and of course the aviation industry. Stay tuned!

Finally, our multinational partner Desmet Ballestra recently documented the full algae extraction process… showing our type of extraction -- aqueous or wet extraction.


I’ve taken the liberty of pointing to it with a big arrow. (Click here.) As you can see, wet extraction bypasses several layers of energy-intensive process, which is why it’s such a breakthrough.

All in all, a busy spring here, with much more to come. I greatly appreciate your support and wish you all the best in your endeavors.
Onward!

Riggs and team.


Riggs Eckelberry
President & CEO
OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL)
www.originoil.com/images/Algae_process_diagram.jpg "
also wer wirklich Alternativen sucht findet sie auch.
statt Oel zu verheizen kann man mit Abfallholzresten(schnitzel) heizen.
Statt Diesel kann man auch Heizoel oder Pflanzenoel in den Dieselmotor schuetten.
Statt Benzin geht auch eine Mischung aus Alkohol und Benzin und Pflanzenoel/Diesel.
Fuers Kerosin gibt es bestimmt auch schon etwas, zum Beispiel Pflanzenoel/Benzin/Alkoholmischung.
Das Gute ist, dass durch eine kleine Benzinbeimischung die verschiedenen Mischungen stabil sind, nicht ausflocken.
Dies haben jedenfalls eigene Versuche ergeben, bin schon Hunderte Kilometer statt mit Benzin mit Alkohol/Benzin und statt mit Diesel mit Pflanzenoel gefahren.
Mit Gas kann man auch fahren wenn man einen Benziner hat, die Umruestung kostet in Polen 2000Zl., danach faehrt man billiger, bekommt sogar TUEV
Here I Am to Save the Day: Microalgae gains momentum with a mighty March - BD - Apr 6, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/06/here-i-am-to-sa…

"It has been nearly a year now since a $600 million investment by ExxonMobil in a project with Synthetic Genomics jolted the biofuels community and sparked what became known as the “summer of algae”.

Though summer has long faded, the astonishing pace of algal fuel development has not lost pace, and in fact March was a mighty month for microcrops. Of the 100 or so announcements that poured into the marketplace, here are the Mighty Dozen that defined a mighty memorable 30 days.


1. In Illinois, Honeywell’s UOP announced that it has received $1.5 million in a cooperative agreement with the DOE for a project to demonstrate technology to capture carbon dioxide and produce algae for use in biofuel and energy production. The funding will be used for the design of a demonstration system that will capture carbon dioxide from exhaust stacks at Honeywell’s manufacturing facility in Hopewell, Va., and deliver the captured CO2 to a cultivation system for algae.

Why it’s mighty: In a word, integration. This is a highly integrated scheme that will test schemes for CO2 capture, algal biomass production, as well RTP rapid thermal processing technology to convert waste biomass from the algae production into pyrolysis oil.


2. In California, Solazyme, the ranked #1 globally in the “50 Hottest Companies in Bioenergy” rankings by a panel of international selectors and the readers of Biofuels Digest, announced that it has signed an R&D agreement with Unilever to develop oil derived from algae for use in soaps and other personal care products. The agreement follows the culmination of a yearlong collaboration between Solazyme and Unilever, in which Solazyme’s renewable algal oils were tested successfully in Unilever product formulations.

Why it’s mighty: Unilever joins the algae race. Solazyme’s project not only adds a dimension – in this case soaps – to the co-product universe, it brings in an established global marketing player to an emerging field. It also might well confirm why Solazyme is felt by most to be gaining traction as fast as any company in the field.


3. In Canada, the St. Marys Cement plant has introduced a CO2 pipeline from its main facility to a $4 million algae-growing demonstration facility operated by Pond Biofuels, which absorbs the CO2 using a strain of algae from the nearby Thames River and produces algae which is burned for electricity used by the plant, or can alternatively provide liquid biofuels for the plant’s truck fleet. The plant, a subsidiary of Brazil’s Grupo Votorantim, is seeking alternatives to potential payments of up to $30 per tone of CO2, which is estimated to add 15 percent to the overall cost of cement. The two project partners received funding from the Ontario Centres of Excellence towards development of the project. Pond Biofuels is utilizing a closed photobioreactor system at a 1500 square foot facility.

Why it’s mighty: CO2. This Canadian project is one of the first to establish a pipeline approach to obtaining CO2 from a cement kiln – which produces much cleaner CO2 than coal-fired power plants.


4. In California, Aurora Biofuels said it has raised an additional $15 million in a recent funding round led by Oak Investment Partners, with the continued support of Gabriel Venture Partners and Noventi Ventures. This third round of financing brings the total amount of money raised by the company to more than $40 million. The new funding will be used to support the continued path to commercialization for its advanced algae biofuel technology.

Why it’s mighty: Renewal. Aurora has several pilots running – this is a major sign that they have assembled enough data to move forward on a design to take them down the path towards commercialization.


5. In the UK, the Carbon Trust awarded $12.19 million to a consortium of 11 universities for a three-year project to establish the UK as a center for algal biofuels research and development. The goal of the group is to develop a process for manufacturing up to 18 billion gallons of algal fuel by 2030.

Why it’s mighty: Europe forms a consortium. The UK Carbon Trust has been known more in biofuels for its pyrolysis work. Here, they bet big on age and have brought together a mammoth number of institutions and companies for the biggest project yet launched on the east side of the Atlantic.


6. In Argentina, algae research is expanding in South America with an announcement of a project at the National Technological University of Mar del Plata to develop an algal fuel solution that offers a 5:1 net energy return on energy invested. The project is utilizing seawater from a Mar de Plata industrial cooling process and is projected to yield 856 gallons of algal oil per acre (8000 liters per hectare). The project, which commenced in 2008, is using flocculation and centrifuges for algae extraction and said it was using an undisclosed algal strain adapted for local conditions.

Why it’s mighty: Seawater. Big energy returns and the progress in Latin America are two more reasons that this early-stage result is worth noting for now, and keeping a sharp eye on for the future.


7. In Utah, Green Star Products and its consortium of algae developers, who previously announced a September 10 auction for what it termed a “game-changing” proprietary algae growth biotechnology, said that that additional licenses have been granted for Utah and Alabama, and that the September 10 auction will now cover rights in 46 US states.

Why it’s mighty: Intrigue. Green Star is no greenhorn in algae – the company has been developing technology for several years. Now, it has adopted a highly unusual auction process for what it says is a major breakthrough, and a number of interested parties, having seen the initial documentation, are reported to be proceeding in their deliberations towards making bids.


8. In the Netherlands, Evodos said that it has reduced its rate of energy consumption for algae harvesting by a factor of three to 0.7 KWh per kilogram (dry weight) of algae. The company’s tests were conducted on Nannochloropsis with an initial concentration of 3 Kg per cubic meter (3 grams per liter), and utilized the next-generation Evodos machines, which the company said are now in production and available for market delivery.

Why it’s mighty: The Evodos announcement now only shows the dramatic advancements still possible in this stage of development – but 0.7 KWh (about 7 cents worth of power) is not bad for a dry kilo of algae, which itself will contain about 2 Kwh, if converted to power.


9. In Delaware, the DOE’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has awarded a Technology Investment Agreement to DuPont for the development of a process to convert sugars produced by macroalgae into next-generation biofuels called isobutanol. Bio Architecture Lab will be a subrecipient on the program. Under this award, the DOE will fund $8.8 million and DuPont and BAL will cost share the balance of the total award, forming a joint cost share program between DOE and DuPont.

Why it’s mighty: Macroalgae is, by definition, much bigger than microoalgae – but all kidding aside, this is one of the first projects to explore the production of butanol as a drop-in fuel from algae.


10. In Arizona, Roy Curtiss, director of the ASU Biodesign Institute’s Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology and professor in the School of Life Sciences, told PhysOrg, “By releasing (cyanobacteria’s) precious cargo outside the cell, we have optimized bacterial metabolic engineering to develop a truly green route to biofuel production.” Curtiss and Xinyao Liu had previously programmed cyanobacteria to self-destruct after producing oils, but have now pioneered a method to use the thioesterase enzyme to separate lipids from their complex protein carriers, and allow fatty acids to pass through the cell walls through diffusion. Voila, continuous production of oils and a three-fold increase in lipid production rates.

Why it’s mighty: Continuous production. Extracting oil without killing cells is the most efficient means of producing algae oil – here, a process to accomplish it.


11. In California, researchers applied an overvoltage to Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as it was exposed to a photon supply from sunlight, and demonstrated that the microalgae strain does, under these conditions, produce a tiny electric current which can be captured from the microalgae colony. At the present time, current yield is extremely low, and not feasible for electricity production — but it opens up the possibility that the biological processes of algae could provide a renewable source of direct electric production in addition to the conversion of fats, carbohydrates and proteins to energy.

Why it’s mighty: Direct production of energy. In other schemes, algae is converted to energy by burning oil or biomass. Here, the process directly captures power without the combustion step. Early days, but intriguing.


12. In California, OriginOil announced the formation of an industry working group to develop jet fuel from algae using waste streams. The group will start by developing integrated process models to identify the critical technologies needed. The working group is co-sponsored by OriginOil and the non-profit consortium Electricore. The first industry partners are biodigester builder Biogas Energy and ionic technology developer Ceramatec. More partner announcements are expected in the weeks to come. The first partners will provide some of the key technologies needed, such as anaerobic digestion and fuel cells. OriginOil’s own Helix Bioreactor and Single Step Extraction systems provide a daily harvest of algae oil and biomass, which can be tailored to meet the ASTM standards for jet fuel.

Why it’s mighty: Jet fuel. Aviation jet fuel from algae is widely regarded as the best hope for renewable jet fuel at massive scale. Here, OriginOil has formed a consortium to advance the science.


And…to add a bonus story to this baker’s dozen, here’s a profile of the National Alliance for Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts, which received a $44 million grant from the Department of Energy to develop a systems approach for sustainable commercialization of algal biofuel (such as renewable gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and bioproducts. "
DOE launches OpenEI.org – open source platform for clean energy data access - BD, WASHINGTON - Apr 8, 2010
http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2010/04/08/doe-launches-op…
www.OpenEI.org
http://vibe.nrel.gov/
www.data.gov

"In Washington, the US Department of Energy released its Open Government Plan highlighting DOE initiatives to maintain and increase transparency, increase participation between the Department, its program offices, sites and the American public, and increase collaborative efforts between the Department and its stakeholders.



- An example of the charts avaioable now at VIBE - the Virtual Information Bridge to Energy - linked from OpenRI.org -


The Three Amigos: OpenEI, data.gov and VIBE

The plan highlights flagship initiatives spearheaded by DOE including the launch of Open Energy Information (OpenEI.org), a new open-source web platform that opens DOE resources and data to the public. The free, editable, and evolving wiki-platform will help to deploy clean energy technologies across the country and the world. OpenEI.org also will provide technical resources, including U.S. lab tools, which can be used by developing countries as they move toward clean energy deployment.

DOE worked with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and other National Laboratories to develop and populate the Open Energy Information Platform. The site currently houses more than 60 clean energy resources and data sets, including maps of worldwide solar and wind potential, information on climate zones, and best practices.

OpenEI.org also links to the Virtual Information Bridge to Energy (VIBE) which is designed as a data analysis hub that will provide a dynamic portal for better understanding energy data. NREL will continue to develop, monitor, and maintain both sites.


Secretary Chu also announced today that the DOE is contributing various tools and data sets for the National Assets program being undertaken by a group of six departments and agencies across the federal government. These agencies, including the National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration in the Department of Health and Human Services; the Agricultural Research Service in the Department of Agriculture; the National Institute of Standards and Technology in the Department of Commerce; the Department of Energy; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, are working together to spur innovation by making it easier for high-tech companies to identify collaborative, entrepreneurial opportunities.

By making information from multiple agencies available in RSS and XML feeds on Data.gov, the National Assets program will increase access to information on publicly-funded technologies that are available for license, opportunities for federal funding and partnerships, and potential private-sector partners.




- A small sample of files available through the National Asset program at Data.gov -


What you’ll find, and what you won’t

Visitors to OpenEI will initially be sorely disappointed, as you’ll see virtually no biofuels data on the home page, and you have to dig for it. However, a visit to Vibe and Data.Gov are virtually mandatory – a treasure trove of industry data, very well visualized through “gadget” technology that will bring up multiple charts by clicking on single “tags” organized by topic.

OpenEI is, in the nature of projects, a work in progress — an excellent start to building transparency. Now, if the DOE could not only make its data, but its decision-making process more transparent – that indeed would be a great leap forward. "
OriginOil Adds Carbon Credits Expert to Industry Working Group; Carbonomics will develop carbon credit solutions for waste-to-jet fuel applications using algae - Apr 15, 2010
www.marketwatch.com/story/originoil-adds-carbon-credits-expe…

"LOS ANGELES, Apr 15, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- OriginOil, Inc. (OOIL), the developer of a breakthrough technology to transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum, announced today that a leading expert in emission-trading has joined the first industry working group to develop jet fuel from algae using waste streams. Carbonomics will help develop a new carbon "asset class" for this promising new activity.

"Carbon penalties can drive CO2 emitters to invest in algae projects," said Riggs Eckelberry, OriginOil CEO. "Beyond that, the global carbon market is expected to grow into the world's largest. That makes Carbonomics a vital member of our working group."


Initially, Carbonomics will determine if the activity complies with the Voluntary Carbon Standard, the American Carbon Registry and possibly the Kyoto Protocol's Clean Development Mechanism. Once a protocol has been established and validated, Carbonomics will work with OriginOil and the other working group members to register projects, perform annual audits, and identify opportunities for credit sales.

Carbonomics President, Seth Baruch, said: "We are excited to work with OriginOil and the rest of the working group to create a new offset methodology for the algae industry. We believe that there is tremendous potential for carbon credits in algae production, and look forward to helping OriginOil lead the industry in creating the necessary baselines for validation and registration."

OriginOil has concluded through its extensive Modeling that carbon credits are a key contributor to cost-effective algae production. Developing a standardized methodology and negotiating emissions reduction purchase agreements will help make the potential of algae a reality.

OriginOil worked with the non-profit consortium Electricore to develop the first industry working group to develop jet fuel from algae using waste streams. The first industry partners, biodigester builder Biogas Energy and ionic technology developer Ceramatec, were announced on March 24, 2010.


About Carbonomics

Carbonomics(R) is a leader in helping businesses realize the potential of carbon credits in the US and international emission-trading markets. Carbonomics identifies greenhouse-gas (GHG) reduction opportunities, determines how projects can generate carbon credits, and guides companies through the entire process - from project inception to annual verification. More at www.carbonomicsonline.com.


About OriginOil, Inc.

OriginOil, Inc. is developing a breakthrough technology that will transform algae, the most promising source of renewable oil, into a true competitor to petroleum. Much of the world's oil and gas is made up of ancient algae deposits. Today, our technology will produce "new oil" from algae, through a cost-effective, high-speed manufacturing process. This endless supply of new oil can be used for many products, such as diesel, gasoline, jet fuel, plastics and solvents, without the global warming effects of petroleum. Other oil-producing feedstock, such as corn and sugarcane, often destroy vital farmlands and rainforests, disrupt global food supplies and create new environmental problems. Our unique technology, based on algae, is targeted at fundamentally changing our source of oil without disrupting the environment or food supplies. To learn more about OriginOil(TM), please visit our website at www.originoil.com. "
>> Geologie Ist Erdöl doch kein endliches Gut?

Möglicherweise wird das schwarze Gold nicht so schnell ausgehen, wie befürchtet. Russische Forscher wollen Hinweise gefunden haben, wonach es sich ständig neu bildet - hunderte Kilometer unter der Erde. Das widerspricht der gängigen Annahme, Erdöl entstehe aus organischem Material.

Stand: 15.03.2010<<

aus: http://www.br-online.de/wissen/umwelt/erdoel-foerderung-vork…

und ein Video dazu: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VypEoooVIto
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.355.108 von humm am 17.04.10 09:05:07
Hi,

Ist doch aber eher als ein bisschen abenteuerliche These zu sehen, oder(um das dazuzusagen: ich mag sowas an sich(viele der genialsten Entdeckungen, Erfindungen etc. gehen auf anfängliche Ungläubigkeit zurück) -würde aber unter keinen Umständen mein Börsenvorgehen nach Besagten ausrichten ;) )?

Gruß
Popeye
>>würde aber unter keinen Umständen mein Börsenvorgehen nach Besagten ausrichten Zwinkern?<<
Wenn nicht, wieso dann Fragenzeichen am Ende? ;)

Ich nehme Abstand vom Öl, wenn es um Investitionen geht. Ich bin stark in Norilsk investiert, also Metalle, da dort die Spekulationsmöglichkeiten nicht so extrem sind wie beim Öl. Klar gibt es auch bei Metalle >Spekulationsblasen< aber nicht so extrem.

Der Ölpreis verhält sich so unlogisch, dass ich nur die Fingern davon lassen kann . . .

:)

humm
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.355.254 von humm am 17.04.10 10:11:11
Naja, wenn Du sagen würdest nicht, dann wäre es ja keine derartige These mehr -&ich würde All-in in potenzielle Profiteure("russische Visionäre" :eek: ) gehen. ;)

Gruß
Popeye
na, gut dass jeder anders denkt, sonst wäre es langweilig ;) wünsche viel Glück! :)
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.355.383 von humm am 17.04.10 11:15:44
"na, gut dass jeder anders denkt ..."


Habe den Wink mit dem Zaunpfahl mehr als deutlich verstanden. ;)


Denke ich aber nicht -ist das jetz gut oder schlecht?? ;)

Gruß
Popeye
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.355.611 von Popeye82 am 17.04.10 12:55:15>>ist das jetzt gut oder schlecht??<<

weder noch. Es sind zwei Wege. Wohin sie führen werde ich dir dann erzählen können, wenn wir >angekommen< sind ;)

Im Erst:
Ich bin sehr vorsichtig, wenn es um Ölpreise geht. Es ist mehr als offensichtlich, dass die Kurse extrem manipuliert werden. Also ist die Frage nicht NUR fundamental begründet, ob es genug Öl auf der Welt gibt oder nicht, sondern zum GRÖßTEN Teil geht es um die Frage, was die großen Spieler vorhaben. Da ich es nicht weiß, ist es eine 50% Chance für mich richtig oder falsch zu wetten. Daher lass ich die Finger davon.

Bei Norilsk, nur als Beispiel, es geht mir weder darum Werbung für Norilsk zu machen, noch jemand vom irgendetwas überzeugen zu wollen, sondern nur meine Gedankengang darzulegen, geht es um einen rissen Konzern der von den stärksten Machtinhabern in Russland beherrscht wird, man könnte es sogar als Mafiastrukturen bezeichnen, die SEHR daran interessiert sind Gewinn zu machen. Dazu kommt meine Einschätzung dass wir vor eine gigantische Inflation stehen, die schon leise angefangen ist.

Ähnlich ist es bei den großen Banken wie BAC zum Beispiel, also lege ich bei solchen >Mafia-Instituten< mein Geld an.
Die Banken, die die Finanzkrise wissentlich kreiert haben, werden die Kosten NIE tragen. Bezahlen muss der Steuerzahler. Wer Geld an der Börse gewinnen will, muss sich das Spiel der Großen anschließen, auch wenn es kein sauberes Spiel ist.

Zurück zum Öl und zu den Links die ich gepostet habe:
Wenn immer weniger Öl in den alten Feldern vorhanden ist, wieso investieren die Firmen da hunderte von Millionen in neue Förderanlagen? Da stimmt was nicht . . . Ich bin da sehr vorsichtig. Die Infos die wir bekommen, sind frisiert.

:)

humm
Brennwertgeräte mit 107 % Wirkungsgrad.

Geht das überhaupt ?, man könnte meinen, man bekommt Gas wieder zurück. Also das ist so ! Ja ja ich weiß, so fängt man keinen Satz an, darum beginne so. Bei der Berechnung des Wirkungsgrades von Wärmeerzeugern ( Kessel, Thermen u.s.w. ) geht man bei der Brennstoffart ( ich bleibe mal beim Gas ) davon aus, daß die Gasmenge gleich 100 % Energie ist. Das ist jedoch falsch, denn im Gas ( und auch im Öl ) befinden sich auch nichtbrennbare Stoffe, nämlich Wasser, und das nicht zu knapp. Ganze 11 % Wasseranteile sind im Gas welche bei der Verbrennung im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes zum Kamin, in Form von Wasserdampf, rausgehen ! Die Brennwerttechnik nutzt nun diesen Wasserdampf, indem die Abgase im Gerät so weit runtergekühlt werden, das diese bereits im Gerät kondensieren und somit als Energie wieder zurückfließt. Mit der Einführung von Brennwerttechnik mußte nun eine neue Berechnungsgrundlage zur Ermittlung des Wirkungsgrades her. Nun hätte man eigentlich diese 11 % von dem Brenntsoff Gas abziehen müssen um dann erst die Abgasverluste zu ermitteln. Allerdings wäre dann ein Erklärungsnotstand ausgebrochen, denn der neue Kessel der gestern noch mit 94 % Wirkungsgrad verkauft wurde, hätte dann plötzlich nur noch einen Wirkungsgrad von schlappen 83 % gehabt. Außerdem hätte man sämtliche Meßgeräte auf dem Schrott schmeißen können, na ja, vieleicht nicht alle. Das wurde dann verworfen, und man hatte dann eine glänzende Idee. Man nehme 100 % Energie und packe 11 % drauf und schon hat man die neue Berechnungsgrundlage für Brennwertgeräte. Nun kommen wir der Sache schon näher. 111 % Energie abzüglich 4 % Verluste die auch ein modernes Brennwertgerät hat, und schon sind wir bei einem rechnerichen !!! Wirkungsgrad von 107 % . Alles klar ?.
:cry:
Wärmepumpen-Kennzahlen - Was Wärmepumpen wirklich leisten

Leistungszahl und Jahresarbeitszahl sind die wichtigsten Wärmepumpen-Kennzahlen. Die Leistungszahl (ε) gibt das Verhältnis zwischen der Wärmeleistung (kW), die ans Heiznetz abgegeben wird und der aufgenommenen elektrischen Leistung der Wärmepumpe (kW) an. Die Leistungszahl gilt jedoch nur für einen bestimmten Betriebspunkt, sie ändert sich permanent je nach Quellen- und Heizungsvorlauftemperatur. Elektro-Wärmepumpen neuerer Bauart erzielen (je nach Wärmequelle) Leistungszahlen zwischen 3,5 und 5,5. Pro kWh Strom werden also 3,5 bis 5,5 kWh Heizwärme erzeugt. Die Leistungszahl lässt allerdings die Leistung elektrischer Hilfsaggregate, die nicht unmittelbar zum Wärmepumpen-Prozess gehören, unberücksichtigt (etwa Heizungsumwälzungspumpen, Grundwasser-Förderpumpen).

Der COP-Wert dagegen gibt auch die Leistungen von Hilfsaggregaten, die Abtau-Energie und die anteilige Pumpenleistung für Heizungs-, Sole- und Grundwasser-Förderpumpen wider. Damit ist der COP-Wert ein Gütekriterium für Wärmepumpen - Prüfinstitute ermitteln diesen Wert nach einer definierten Messmethode (DIN EN 255). Leistungszahl und COP-Wert erlauben allerdings keine energetische Bewertung der Gesamtanlage. Für eine solche Bewertung ist die Jahresarbeitszahl entscheidend.

Die wichtigere Wärmepumpen-Kennzahl für den Wirkungsgrad ist somit die Jahresarbeitszahl ß. Sie bezeichnet über ein Jahr hinweg das Verhältnis zwischen abgegebener Wärmemenge (Heizwärme) und zugeführter Energie (Antriebsenergie). Wie der COP-Wert enthält auch die Jahresarbeitszahl anteilig die Leistungen von Heizungsumwälzpumpen und Grundwasser- bzw. Sole-Förderpumpen. Die Jahresarbeitszahl kann somit auch als Anlagennutzungsgrad verstanden werden. Sie eignet sich damit gut zur energetischen Bewertung der Gesamtanlage. In der Praxis erreichen z.B. Luft/Wasser-Wärmepumpen Werte von 2 bis 4, moderne Luft/Wasser-Wärmepumpen sollten also die Jahresarbeitszahl von 3,5 übertreffen.

Gelegentlich wird bei der Berechnung der Primärenergiefaktor bestimmt, der die Jahresarbeitszahl auf den Wirkungsgrad der eingesetzten Fremdenergieerzeugung bezieht. So ergäbe sich für eine Elektro-Wärmepumpe, die ihren Strom aus einem Kraftwerk mit 40 Prozent Wirkungsgrad bezieht, bereits bei einer Jahresarbeitszahl von 3 ein Primärenergiefaktor von 1,2.

Die wichtigste Wärmepumpen-Kennzahl ist der Nutzungsgrad. Er ist das Maß für die in einer Heizperiode tatsächlich verwendete Menge an Energie, die in einem Energieträger gespeichert ist. Er wird über einen längeren Zeitraum bestimmt. Der Wirkungsgrad dagegen wird nur in einem Betriebspunkt gemessen. Er ist in der Regel höher als der Nutzungsgrad, weil der Wirkungsgrad aufgrund des optimalen Betriebszustandes bestimmt wird. So hat ein Ölkessel beispielsweise bei Vollast am Prüfstand einen Wirkungsgrad von 85 Prozent. Unter realen Nutzungsbedingungen erreicht er über eine Heizperiode möglicherweise lediglich einen Nutzungsgrad von 60 Prozent, denn er wird fast nie im optimalen Betriebspunkt betrieben, sondern immer nur im Teillast- oder Taktbetrieb. Die Beurteilung einer Wärmepumpe sollte also nicht alleine über deren Wirkungsgrad getroffen werden, sondern sollte über die Betrachtung des gesamten praxisrelevanten Betriebsbereiches und aller Wärmepumpen-Kennzahlen erfolgen.
Studie der TU München zu Wärmepumpen




Die weitere Zunahme der Anzahl an Wärmepumpen in der Gebäudeheizung wird Primärenergie einsparen und CO2-Emissionen reduzieren: Dies ist das Ergebnis der Studie „Energiewirtschaftliche Bewertung der Wärmepumpe in der Gebäudeheizung“, die Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ulrich Wagner von der TU München, am 23. April 2009 in Berlin vorstellte.

Im Rahmen der Auftaktveranstaltung zu den Aktionswochen Wärmepumpe, die noch bis zum 10. Mai 2009 bundesweit bei mehr 1.500 lokalen Informations- und Erlebnisveranstaltungen Interessierte, Hausbesitzer und Fachleute über alles Wissenswerte rund um die Wärmepumpe informieren soll, belegt die Studie die ökologische Relevanz der Wärmepumpentechnik.

Welche Auswirkungen der verstärkte Einsatz von Wärmepumpen hat – ob die Technik, die regenerative Energien nutzbar macht, tatsächlich wirtschaftlich und in den Anforderungen des Umweltschutzes zukunftsweisend ist, untersucht die Studie von Professor Wagner vom Lehrstuhl Energiewirtschaft und Anwendungstechnik (IfE). Dafür vergleicht sie den Primärenergieeinsatz und die CO2-Emissionen von Wärmepumpen mit Gas- und Öl-Brennwertheizungen und älteren Ölkesseln, jeweils für den Strommix von 2008 und 2030. Grundlage für den Vergleich ist dabei die Jahresarbeitszahl (JAZ) der Wärmepumpe – ein Maß für die Effizienz, das das Verhältnis von abgegebener Nutzwärme zu eingesetztem Strom beziffert. Auch die Auswirkungen der weiteren Zunahme an Wärmepumpen auf den Kraftwerkspark wurden untersucht.

Bereits beim derzeitigen Strommix spart eine Wärmepumpe, laut der Studie, im Vergleich zu einem hocheffizienten Gas-Brennwertkessel ab einer Jahresarbeitszahl von 2,2 Primärenergie und benötigt bei einer JAZ von 4,5 weniger als die Hälfte. Im Jahr 2030 schneiden Wärmepumpen bereits ab einer JAZ von 1,8 besser ab als die effizientesten fossilen Heizsysteme; ab einer JAZ von 3,5 sparen sie bereits 50 Prozent Primärenergie. Insgesamt sparen die prognostizierten 1 Million zusätzlichen Wärmepumpen in Deutschland 2030 jährlich 9,49 kWh Primärenergie.

Bereits 2008 verringert eine Wärmepumpe ab einer Jahresarbeitszahl von mehr als 2,0 die CO2-Emissionen – bei einer Jahresarbeitszahl von 4,0 sinken die CO2-Emissionen sogar um 50 Prozent im Vergleich zum effizientesten Referenzsystem, dem Gasbrennwertkessel. 2030 unterschreitet eine Wärmepumpe bereits ab einer JAZ von 3,6 die Marke von 100 g CO2/kWh Wärme – ein Drittel der Emissionen eines Öl-Brennwertkessels oder 40 Prozent eines Gas-Brennwertgeräts. Insgesamt sparen nach der TU-Studie die prognostizierten 1 Million zusätzlichen Wärmepumpen in Deutschland 2030 im Vergleich zu Gas-Brennwertheizungen jährlich 2,3 Millionen Tonnen CO2.

2008 stieg die Anzahl der in Deutschland verkauften Heizungs-Wärmepumpen auf rund 62.500 Anlagen. Damit nahm der Absatz im Vergleich zum Vorjahr um mehr als ein Drittel zu.

Quelle
http://www.detail.de/artikel_waermepumpe-energieverbrauch_23…
Jahresarbeitszahl: Wärmepumpe (Erdwärme, Grundwasser, Luft)

Wärmepumpensystem
in Deutschland
Jahresarbeitszahl

bei einer Fußbodenheizung
Erdwärme 3.4
Grundwasser 3.0
Luft 2.8

Jahresarbeitszahl
bei normalen Heizkörpern

Erdwärme 3.1
Grundwasser 2.7
Luft 2.5



Quelle

http://www.umweltbewusst-heizen.de/Heizungsvergleich/Waermep…
Ich nehme Abstand vom Öl , wenn es um Investitionen geht. Ich bin stark in Norilsk investiert, also Metalle, da dort die Spekulationsmöglichkeiten nicht so extrem sind wie beim Öl. Klar gibt es auch bei Metalle >Spekulationsblasen< aber nicht so extrem

Zum Beispiel beim Nickelpreis :laugh:

Spekulationen haben weniger Einfluss als Medien und Politiker beklagen.
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.355.254 von humm am 17.04.10 10:11:11
und @#614,

Als erstes Mal -wünsche Dir natürlich auch alles Gute. :) ;) Also ich gehe davon aus, dass die meisten Märkte, wie &wie stark dann auch immer, in der ein- oder anderen Form manipuliert sind. Wenn es dann allerdings mal "richtig dick" kommt, können sich allerdings auch die "potenziellen Profiteure" gewaltig die Finger daran verbrennen(bei Öl -siehe einfach mal den 1 -2Jahreschart).

Allerdings gehe ich davon aus, dass uns das Öl m.d.Zeit wirklich ausgeht(ob wir das "Peak Öl" nun schon hinter uns haben oder nicht ist finde ich eine müssige Diskussion -allerdings würde ich davon ausgehen, dass es "mindestens kurz bevorsteht")&in der Folge die Ölpreise "mittelfristig" sich, weiterhin, deutlich nach oben orientieren dürften. Bezieht sich natürlich erstmal alles auf konventionelles Öl, wird ja darüberhinaus an einer ganzen Menge Alternativen/Hoffnungen rumgebastelt.

"Wenn immer weniger Öl in den alten Feldern vorhanden ist, wieso investieren die Firmen da hunderte von Millionen in neue Förderanlagen? Da stimmt was nicht . . . Ich bin da sehr vorsichtig. Die Infos die wir bekommen, sind frisiert. ..."

Zum 1sten -GENAU DESWEGEN. ;) Zum 2ten -denke auch, dass eine ganze Menge frisiert ist, was die Allgemeinheit/wir so vor die Augen bekommen. Umso wichtiger ist es auf verfüg/belegbaren Fakten aufzubauen.


Genauere Schätzungen sind immer so eine Sache, aber ich würde schon davon ausgehen, dass wir in spätestens 10Jahren, bei relativ kontinuierlich >/= 150$/Barrel stehen. Könnte denke ich durchaus auch (deutlich)mehr werden. Mal schauen. Und unter solchen Annahmen lässt sich dann halt´ schon ein (Invest)Szenario aufbauen.

Gruß
Popeye
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.371.584 von Popeye82 am 20.04.10 23:36:25>>Genauere Schätzungen sind immer so eine Sache, aber ich würde schon davon ausgehen, dass wir in spätestens 10Jahren, bei relativ kontinuierlich >/= 150$/Barrel stehen.<<

Na; da bin ich mir ziemlich sicher, dass wir in zwei bis drei Jahre bei 150 USD/Barrel stehen werden.
Aber nicht weil Öl knapp wird, sondern wegen was ganz anderes. Die Staatsverschuldung und die Unmenge an Geld was zurzeit in Umlauf ist, wegen so genannte >Konjunkturprogramme< aller Art. (die ich nicht schlecht reden will, aber zu einer unerwünschte Nebenwirkung führen müssen.)
Es ist sehr Einfach: Doppelte Menge Geld im Umlauf bei konstant bleibende Menge an Güter, erzwingt, früher oder später, zu 100% Inflation, also zu Verdopplung des Preises der Güter.

Daher ist es fast egal ob ich in Weizen, Öl, oder Metalle investiere. ;o)

Die Falle besteht darin dass keiner in der EU oder USA eine echte Inflation zu seiner Lebzeit erlebt hat. Daher können sich die meisten so was gar nicht vorstellen. Ich glaube sehr fest daran, dass Inflation von 6 bis 10% pro Jahr, auf uns zukommen wird und das sind vorsichtige Schätzungen . . .
Wie soll die Regierung ihre Schulden sonst bezahlen? Es geht gar nicht in eine Demokratie die auf Vierjahrentakt der falschen Versprechungen basiert . . . :rolleyes:
Antwort auf Beitrag Nr.: 39.372.608 von humm am 21.04.10 09:31:54
"Daher ist es fast egal ob ich in Weizen, Öl, oder Metalle investiere. ;o) ..."


Na dann -einfach bei investieren gar nicht mehr nachdenken, Namen an die Wand kleben, Dartpfeile rausholen und ... ;)


Etwas Galgenhumor. Nein, ist vom Grundsatz schon richtig(ich denke allerdings, dass Öl auch inflationsunabhängig steigen wird).

Gruß
Popeye
Wie haben sich die Wirkungsgrade der Kohlekraftwerke entwickelt und was ist künftig zu erwarten?



Die Stromerzeugung aus Kohle begann Ende des 19./Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts. Die ersten Anlagen hatten einen Wirkungsgrad von 1 Prozent, d. h. es wurden 12,3 kg Kohle zur Herstellung einer elektrischen kWh verbraucht. Dies war gleichbedeutend mit einer Emission von 37 kg CO2 je kWh.

Mit zunehmender technischer Erfahrung sowie Forschung und Entwicklung setzte bereits früh eine spürbare Erhöhung der Wirkungsgrade ein. Die Weiterentwicklung der Verbrennungstechnik, der Werkstoff- und Verfahrenstechnik ermöglichte in der Folgezeit eine ständige Erhöhung der Dampf-Parameter Druck und Temperatur und damit der Wirkungsgrades. In den 1910er Jahren wurde bereits ein Wirkungsgrad von 5 % erzielt, 1920 waren es bereits 20 %. Ab 1950 erbrachten Kraftwerks-Neubauten bereits Wirkungsgrade von 30%, wobei allerdings der Durchschnittswert aller Kraftwerke noch bei mäßigen 17 % lag. Durch die notwendig werdende Anwendung von Kühltürmen zur Abfuhr der nicht mehr in Strom umwandelbaren Wärme und später von Rauchgasentschwefelungs- und Stickoxidminderungsverfahren war zunächst ein Rückschlag der Wirkungsgrade zu verzeichnen, da diese Anlagen selbst auch Energie benötigen. Doch die ständige nachhaltige Weiterentwicklung führte bereits Mitte der achtziger Jahre zu einem Durchschnittswert aller in Betrieb befindlichen Kraftwerke von 38 % (323 g SKE) und zu Bestwerten von 43 %. In der zweiten Hälfte der neunziger Jahre erzielte ein dänisches Kraftwerk den Welt-Bestwert von 47 %.

Kraftwerke auf Braunkohlebasis haben wegen der andersartigen Eigenschaften der Braunkohle einen Wirkungsgrad, der um einige Prozent niedriger liegt als der von Steinkohlekraftwerken. Dennoch konnte die im Jahre 2002 ans Netz gegangene BoA-Anlage (Braunkohlekraftwerk mit optimierter Anlagentechnik) der RWE Power AG einen Netto-Wirkungsgrad von 45,3 Prozent erzielen, der höchste jemals von einem Braunkohlekraftwerk erreichte Wert.

Der durchschnittliche Wirkungsgrad alle Kohlekraftwerke der Welt beträgt z. Z. etwa 31 %. Somit steckt noch ein sehr hohes Entwicklungspotenzial zur Senkung des Kohleverbrauchs und der CO2-Emissionen in dieser Technik.

In der Europäischen Union (E-15) bestehen für die nächsten 20 Jahre ein Zusatzbedarf an Kraftwerkskapazität von 100.000 und ein Ersatzbedarf von 200.000 MW. Deshalb ist eine erhebliche Weiterentwicklung der Kohlekraftwerkstechnik in Gange. Sie zielt in den nächsten 10 Jahren auf einen Wirkungsgrad bis zu 55 %. Dies würde einen spezifischen Kohleverbrauch von 223 g SKE je kWh bedeuten.

Weitere Entwicklungen verfolgen die Einführung von Gas- und Dampfturbinen (GuD)-Prozessen in die Kohlekraftwerkstechnik. Auch sie zielen auf Wirkungsgrade um 55 %.

Die heutigen und zukünftigen Wirkungsgrade von Kohlekraftwerken liegen bei vergleichbaren Bilanzgrenzen in der oberen Hälfte der Wirkungsgrade aller Stromerzeugungstechnologien.

Quelle

http://www.energie-fakten.de/html/wirkungsgrade.html
Wie haben sich die Wirkungsgrade der Kohlekraftwerke entwickelt und was ist künftig zu erwarten?



Die Stromerzeugung aus Kohle begann Ende des 19./Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts. Die ersten Anlagen hatten einen Wirkungsgrad von 1 Prozent, d. h. es wurden 12,3 kg Kohle zur Herstellung einer elektrischen kWh verbraucht. Dies war gleichbedeutend mit einer Emission von 37 kg CO2 je kWh.

Mit zunehmender technischer Erfahrung sowie Forschung und Entwicklung setzte bereits früh eine spürbare Erhöhung der Wirkungsgrade ein. Die Weiterentwicklung der Verbrennungstechnik, der Werkstoff- und Verfahrenstechnik ermöglichte in der Folgezeit eine ständige Erhöhung der Dampf-Parameter Druck und Temperatur und damit der Wirkungsgrades. In den 1910er Jahren wurde bereits ein Wirkungsgrad von 5 % erzielt, 1920 waren es bereits 20 %. Ab 1950 erbrachten Kraftwerks-Neubauten bereits Wirkungsgrade von 30%, wobei allerdings der Durchschnittswert aller Kraftwerke noch bei mäßigen 17 % lag. Durch die notwendig werdende Anwendung von Kühltürmen zur Abfuhr der nicht mehr in Strom umwandelbaren Wärme und später von Rauchgasentschwefelungs- und Stickoxidminderungsverfahren war zunächst ein Rückschlag der Wirkungsgrade zu verzeichnen, da diese Anlagen selbst auch Energie benötigen. Doch die ständige nachhaltige Weiterentwicklung führte bereits Mitte der achtziger Jahre zu einem Durchschnittswert aller in Betrieb befindlichen Kraftwerke von 38 % (323 g SKE) und zu Bestwerten von 43 %. In der zweiten Hälfte der neunziger Jahre erzielte ein dänisches Kraftwerk den Welt-Bestwert von 47 %.

Kraftwerke auf Braunkohlebasis haben wegen der andersartigen Eigenschaften der Braunkohle einen Wirkungsgrad, der um einige Prozent niedriger liegt als der von Steinkohlekraftwerken. Dennoch konnte die im Jahre 2002 ans Netz gegangene BoA-Anlage (Braunkohlekraftwerk mit optimierter Anlagentechnik) der RWE Power AG einen Netto-Wirkungsgrad von 45,3 Prozent erzielen, der höchste jemals von einem Braunkohlekraftwerk erreichte Wert.

Der durchschnittliche Wirkungsgrad alle Kohlekraftwerke der Welt beträgt z. Z. etwa 31 %. Somit steckt noch ein sehr hohes Entwicklungspotenzial zur Senkung des Kohleverbrauchs und der CO2-Emissionen in dieser Technik.

In der Europäischen Union (E-15) bestehen für die nächsten 20 Jahre ein Zusatzbedarf an Kraftwerkskapazität von 100.000 und ein Ersatzbedarf von 200.000 MW. Deshalb ist eine erhebliche Weiterentwicklung der Kohlekraftwerkstechnik in Gange. Sie zielt in den nächsten 10 Jahren auf einen Wirkungsgrad bis zu 55 %. Dies würde einen spezifischen Kohleverbrauch von 223 g SKE je kWh bedeuten.

Weitere Entwicklungen verfolgen die Einführung von Gas- und Dampfturbinen (GuD)-Prozessen in die Kohlekraftwerkstechnik. Auch sie zielen auf Wirkungsgrade um 55 %.

Die heutigen und zukünftigen Wirkungsgrade von Kohlekraftwerken liegen bei vergleichbaren Bilanzgrenzen in der oberen Hälfte der Wirkungsgrade aller Stromerzeugungstechnologien.

Quelle

http://www.energie-fakten.de/html/wirkungsgrade.html
Abbildung 2: Aufteilung des Endenergieverbrauchs auf die Anwendungsarten und Sektoren

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