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     129  0 Kommentare New Publication Shows DecisionDx-SCC Identifies High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Who Are Likely to Benefit from Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Those Who Can Consider Deferring Treatment Based on Biological Risk of Metastasis

    Castle Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: CSTL), a company improving health through innovative tests that guide patient care, today announced the publication of a study in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal) demonstrating the ability of the DecisionDx-SCC test to identify high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) patients at the highest risk of metastasis who will benefit the most from ART to reduce metastatic disease progression, as well as high-risk patients who the test identified as having a lower risk of metastasis who may consider deferring treatment. These results demonstrate the impact of the test in guiding decision-making for recommending ART.

    “Radiation may be considered for patients with more aggressive SCC tumors to reduce the risk of the cancer returning once the tumor has been removed through surgery,” said Sarah T. Arron, M.D. Ph.D., lead author and board-certified dermatologist and Mohs surgeon at Peninsula Dermatology in Burlingame, California. “When relying on current risk assessment and staging systems alone, it can be very challenging to determine for which patients with high-risk SCC the benefits of radiation therapy outweigh the significant side effects and associated impacts on the patient’s quality of life.

    “The study found that DecisionDx-SCC test results can assist clinicians in making these difficult decisions by identifying which patients are most likely to benefit from the treatment.”

    Key findings of the study (n=920 patients) include:

    • The DecisionDx-SCC test identified patients projected to receive the greatest benefit from ART to reduce metastatic disease progression. Patients with a Class 2B (highest metastatic risk) test result who were treated with ART had 50% higher MFS rates, on average, than Class 2B patients who did not receive ART at five years post-diagnosis.
    • A DecisionDx-SCC Class 2B result was the only independent risk factor that successfully identified patients who would most benefit from ART. Risk factors in the analysis included differentiation status, invasion into fat, perineural invasion and others, including National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk category and Brigham and Women's Hospital and American Joint Committee on Cancer Eighth Edition T-stages.
    • Class 2B patients who received ART showed a significant deceleration in disease progression compared to Class 2B patients who did not receive ART. For patients with a DecisionDx-SCC Class 2B test result who were not treated with ART, there was a peak rate of metastasis around two years; Class 2B, ART-treated patients had nearly five times longer projected time to metastasis.
    • DecisionDx-SCC identified patients who were less likely to show a significant benefit from ART in controlling disease progression. Patients with high-risk clinicopathologic features but who received a DecisionDx-SCC Class 1 (lower metastatic risk) test result did not show a significant benefit from ART. Given the low risk of metastasis for Class 1 patients, in addition to the lower likelihood of ART benefit, Class 1 patients may consider deferring treatment.

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    New Publication Shows DecisionDx-SCC Identifies High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Who Are Likely to Benefit from Adjuvant Radiation Therapy and Those Who Can Consider Deferring Treatment Based on Biological Risk of Metastasis Castle Biosciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: CSTL), a company improving health through innovative tests that guide patient care, today announced the publication of a study in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal) …

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